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Iowa couple receives 3-year probation after dehydrated infant found with cocaine in system

An Iowa couple was sentenced to three years of probation last Thursday aftertheir then-3-month-old baby girl tested positive for cocaine, according to theDes Moines Register


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Diplomats' brain scans show differences, add to Cuba mystery

Advanced brain scans found perplexing differences in U.S. diplomats who say they developed concussion-like symptoms after working in Cuba, a finding that only heightens the mystery of what may have happened to them, a new study says. Extensive imaging tests showed the workers had less white matter than a comparison group of healthy people and other structural differences, researchers said. While they had expected the cerebellum, near the brain stem, to be affected given the workers' reported symptoms — balance problems, sleep and thinking difficulties, headaches and other complaints — they found unique patterns in tissue connecting brain regions.


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Researchers to commemorate first 'dead' glacier with plaque, memorial service in Iceland

Researchers and members of the Icelandic community will commemorate the first lost glacier with a plaque and memorial service at the site where it once stood. The Okjökull Glacier in Borgarfjörður, West Iceland, lost its glacier status in 2014 after it significantly melted down, according to Rice University in Houston. On Aug. 18, scientists will join Icelandic author Andri Snær Magnason, geologist Oddur Sigurðsson -- the glaciologist who first declared Okjökull as "dead" -- and the Icelandic Hiking Society to present the monument to citizens, according to Rice University.


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What Is Erythrodermic Psoriasis? Dermatologists Explain The Severe Skin Condition

Erythrodermic psoriasis is the most severe type of psoriasis that can cause large sections of red, scaly patches over the entire body, along with other health issues. Here's what to know, according to dermatologists.


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Apple Seeks Mac Pro Parts Tariff Exclusion After Move to China

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 10 hours 33 min ago

(Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. has asked the Trump administration to exclude components that make up the forthcoming Mac Pro high-end desktop computer from import tariffs, weeks after planning to re-locate production of the line to China from Texas.The Cupertino, California-based technology giant is seeking relief from duties of 25% on key Mac Pro parts and accessories that go with it, ranging from the stainless steel and aluminum frame, power supplies, internal cables and circuit boards, and its optional wheels, according to filings posted by the Office of U.S. Trade Representative. The documents don’t specifically mention the Mac Pro, but the features and dimensions listed by Apple in the filing closely resemble the planned computer.The exclusion requests from the iPhone maker were posted July 18 and are now subject to a public comment period before they’re reviewed. Some Apple products have been spared from tariffs in the past, including the Apple Watch and AirPods. Apple declined to comment on the filing.U.S. President Donald Trump has promised relief if companies can show that parts or products can only be obtained in China, aren’t “strategically important” to Chinese industrial programs, or that the duties would cause “severe economic harm.” Trump has tweeted that companies won’t face a tariff if they make their goods “at home in the USA.”The new Mac Pro will be manufactured in China, a person familiar with the company’s plans said last month, shifting production of what had been Apple’s only major device assembled in the U.S. The previous design had been built in Texas since 2013. The new model was announced in June and will go on sale later this year, starting at $5999. Apple said last month that “final assembly is only one part of the manufacturing process.”Apple is also seeking duty exclusions on its Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad, complementary devices for operating the computer, as well as an accompanying USB cable for charging external mobile devices.Trump slapped tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese goods last year in response to a trade deficit and allegations of intellectual property theft and unfair trade practices as the world’s two largest economies seek to negotiate a sweeping trade deal.Trump had threatened tariffs on an additional $300 billion in Chinese imports in May in response to what he said was Beijing’s reneging on agreed provisions. But he put them on hold after meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in June in Japan to restart negotiations.To contact the reporters on this story: Mark Gurman in San Francisco at mgurman1@bloomberg.net;Mark Niquette in Columbus at mniquette@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Margaret Collins at mcollins45@bloomberg.net, ;Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Molly Schuetz, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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Doctors Dismissed Their Symptoms As Perimenopause, But These Women Knew It Was More

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 10 hours 37 min ago

For Patti Graves, her abnormal periods turned out to be cancer.


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What Is Malaria, and Where Are You Most at Risk?

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 10 hours 38 min ago

Keep this in mind if you're traveling this summer.


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Portuguese firefighters bring forest blazes under control

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 10 hours 53 min ago

Firefighters aided by overnight rain on Tuesday brought under control massive wildfires raging for four days in a central region of Portugal where dozens of people died in huge blazes in 2017. Nearly 1,100 firefighters were still deployed to completely put out the fires, which ripped through the heavily forested Castelo Branco region, 200 kilometres (120 miles) north of Lisbon, said commander Luis Belo Costa of the civil protection agency. Portugal's civil protection agency had said on Monday morning the wildfires were "90 percent controlled", but strong winds fanned the flames into life again in the afternoon.


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Registration Open for the ICARE Academy on September 10-11, 2019, in Alexandria, VA

NIH Funding Opportunities - 10 hours 53 min ago
Notice NOT-OD-19-123 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts
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Microbiome and Aging: Impact on Health and Disease (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

NIH Funding Opportunities - 10 hours 56 min ago
Funding Opportunity RFA-AG-20-030 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites projects focused on defining the factors that influence microbiome composition and functional characteristics during aging, understanding how the aging microbiome relates to the causes and pathophysiology of age-related chronic diseases, and development and testing of targeted interventions through diet, drugs, or live organisms. This FOA will accept basic mechanistic, preclinical studies in animal models and human studies leveraging existing human longitudinal cohorts.
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What Is Lung Cancer’s Survival Rate?

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 11 hours 16 min ago

Lung cancer has a reputation as an always-fatal disease, but prognosis depends on the type of tumor and when it’s diagnosed.


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Scans show changes to brains of 'injured' Havana U.S. embassy workers

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 11 hours 21 min ago

University of Pennsylvania researchers said symptoms described by the embassy workers may be reflected in their brain scans when compared with those of healthy volunteers. The difference between the brains of the workers and people in a control group "is pretty jaw-dropping at the moment," lead researcher Dr. Ragini Verma, a professor of radiology at Penn, told Reuters in a phone interview. The health problems of more than two dozen workers surfaced in 2016 after the Obama administration reopened the embassy in an effort to improve relations with the Communist island nation.


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The Stages of Lung Cancer, Explained

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 11 hours 36 min ago

A patient’s prognosis depends a lot on how big their tumor is and how far it’s spread.


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Sex with HIV still a crime? Updated laws divide advocates

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 11 hours 39 min ago

As Sanjay Johnson describes it, his sexual encounter with James Booth on Oct. 2, 2015, was a one-night stand. Little Rock prosecutors pursued a criminal charge against Johnson even though a doctor said he couldn't have transmitted HIV to Booth because he was on medication that suppressed his virus. Booth said he deserved to know about Johnson's HIV status regardless of any medical treatment.


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New implant, vaccine trial offer fresh HIV hope

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 11 hours 39 min ago

A matchstick-sized implant could revolutionise HIV prevention regimes after early trials suggested the device could stop at-risk people contracting the virus for up to a year at a time, new research showed Tuesday. It uses a molecule called MK-8591, which is roughly 10 times stronger as an HIV inhibitor than medicines currently on the market, and which has a very high barrier against resistance. "It slowly releases the drug and maintains a very consistent level of the drug in your body and taking this prophylactically it can actually prevent you from getting infected," Mike Robertson, director global clinical development for virology at MSD research, told AFP.


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Scans show changes to brains of 'injured' Havana U.S. embassy workers

University of Pennsylvania researchers said symptoms described by the embassy workers may be reflected in their brain scans when compared with those of healthy volunteers. The difference between the brains of the workers and people in a control group "is pretty jaw-dropping at the moment," lead researcher Dr. Ragini Verma, a professor of radiology at Penn, told Reuters in a phone interview. The health problems of more than two dozen workers surfaced in 2016 after the Obama administration reopened the embassy in an effort to improve relations with the Communist island nation.


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The Magic Time Window to Take a Bath or Shower for a Better Night's Sleep

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 12 hours 31 min ago

New research from University of Texas at Austin suggests this is the best time to hop in the bath.


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Earth Is Littered with Mysterious Space-Cones, and Now We Know Why

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - 12 hours 41 min ago

Earth is littered with cones from space, and it's our planet's own fault.Most meteorites found on Earth are just randomly shaped blobs. But a surprisingly high number of them, about 25%, are cone-shaped when you fit all their pieces back together. Scientists call these conical space-stones "oriented meteorites." And now, thanks to a pair of experiments published online today (July 22) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), we know why: The atmosphere is carving the rocks into more aerodynamic shapes as they fall to Earth."These experiments tell an origin story for oriented meteorites," Leif Ristroph, a New York University (NYU) mathematical physicist who led the study, said in a statement. "The very aerodynamic forces that melt and reshape meteoroids in flight also stabilize [them] so that a cone shape can be carved and ultimately arrive on Earth." [The 10 Biggest Impact Craters on Earth]It's difficult to precisely replicate the environment meteoroids encounter on their way to our planet's surface. The space rocks slam into the atmosphere at high speeds, generating intense, sudden friction that heats, melts and deforms the objects as they freely tumble. Those conditions didn't exist in the NYU lab where the study occurred, but the researchers approximated those factors by using softer materials and water, and by breaking the experiment up into parts.First, the researchers pinned balls of soft clay in the center of streams of rushing water, a rough approximation of a heavy rock hitting an atmosphere. The clay, the scientists found, tended to deform and erode into a cone shape.But that experiment alone wouldn't explain much. The soft clay wasn't allowed to move in the water -- a very different situation from a rock free to tumble loose through the upper atmosphere and somehow orient itself.So, for the second step, the researchers dropped different sorts of cones into water to see how they fell. It turns out that cones that are too narrow or too fat tend to tumble, like rocks of any other shape would do. But there were "Goldilocks" cones, in between those two extremes, that flipped until their points aimed along their direction of travel, like an arrow, and then glided smoothly through the water.These two experiments together seem to show that when certain conditions are met, space rocks will develop conical shapes under the extreme friction of an atmospheric entry. And sometimes those conical parts will help these tumbling rocks stabilize, pointing in a consistent direction as they fall. That stability, in turn, will make them more and more conical. Then, when these rocks strike the ground, meteorite hunters encounter the remains of "oriented," conical space rocks. * Fallen Stars: A Gallery of Famous Meteorites * Space-y Tales: The 5 Strangest Meteorites in History * Danger! Falling Rocks: Asteroids and Meteorites ExplainedOriginally published on Live Science.


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