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Updated: 43 min 38 sec ago

Adobe Gains as Revenue Tops Estimates on Expanded Portfolio

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 15:36

(Bloomberg) -- Adobe Inc. reported quarterly revenue that topped Wall Street estimates, signaling the Photoshop maker’s expanding product suite is continuing to fuel growth.Sales increased 25% to $2.74 billion in the fiscal second quarter from a year earlier, the San Jose, California-based company said Tuesday in a statement. Analysts, on average, projected $2.7 billion.For more than a decade, Chief Executive Officer Shantanu Narayen has sought to diversify the company known for creative software. Adobe made two big-ticket acquisitions in the past year, Magento, an e-commerce company, and Marketo, which sold marketing software, and is now working to integrate its bigger line of products. Adobe unveiled a software platform in March that will further connect the company’s programs with other systems, so clients can glean more insights about their consumer data.“We expect the first half momentum to continue in the second half,” Narayen said on a conference call. “Our revenue growth, cash flow, and operating profit differentiates us among” large software companies.Adobe’s shares gained about 2.8% in extended trading after closing at $276.78 in New York.The company, however, gave a profit forecast that fell short of analysts’ projections for the second consecutive quarter. Earnings, excluding some expenses, will be about $1.95 a share in the current period. Analysts estimated $2.05 a share, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.There’s “a bit of a relief that something didn’t go wrong,” Pat Walravens, an analyst at JMP Securities, said in an interview. “They had a nice beat and they’re maintaining a steady 25% growth rate. That’s solid.”Adobe’s stock has been an investor favorite for years, jumping sevenfold from 2012 through the end of 2018 -- six times more the S&P 500 Index and far outpacing rivals. While the shares have gained 22% this year, the enthusiasm has cooled since March after the earnings forecast missed estimates. The stock increased just 3.4% since that March 14 outlook through Tuesday’s close.Sales from Adobe’s experience cloud division, which comprises marketing, analytics and e-commerce tools, climbed 34% to $784 million in the period ended May 31, and is projected to grow by the same percentage in the fiscal third quarter.The creative cloud division, led by Photoshop, grew 22% to $1.89 billion in the quarter and is projected to increase by 20% in the period ending in August.Adobe’s remaining performance obligation, a measure of future revenue under contract, increased to $8.37 billion, compared with $8.13 billion at the end of the fiscal first quarter. That metric, plus the sales projection for the company’s experience unit, suggests demand will remain steady.(Updates with comments from analyst in the seventh paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Nico Grant in San Francisco at ngrant20@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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Men who eat two portions of yoghurt are less likely to develop bowel cancer, major study finds

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 15:30

Men who have two portions of yoghurt a week could cut the risk of precancerous growths by a fifth, a study suggests. Research by the University of Washington found those eating plenty of it had a significantly lower chance of developing adenoma which can lead to bowel cancer. The study, published in Gut, which tracked more than 32,000 men for 25 years, found that those consuming at least two portions of yoghurt a week had 19 per cent fewer growths - and 26 per cent fewer of the most high-risk type. The study was observational, and could not demonstrate why the foodstuff might have such an impact. But scientists said that Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, two bacteria commonly found in live yogurt, may lower the number of cancer causing chemicals in the gut. The anti-inflammatory properties might also reduce gut leakiness, which could also protect against disease, they said. The study tracked a total of 32,606 men and 55,743 women, all of whom had a lower bowel endoscopy, which enables medics to view the inside of their gut. Bowel cancer | Six signs to watch out for Every four years they provided detailed information on lifestyle and diet - including how much yoghurt they ate. During the study period, 5,811 pre-cancerous growths developed in the men, and 8,116 in the women. While men who ate yoghurt had a far lower risk of developing the growths, called adenoma, no association was seen in women. Katie Patrick, health information officer, from Cancer Research UK, said: “The colon is home to trillions of microbes and how the bacteria in our gut might affect bowel cancer risk is a fascinating area of research. Lots of things affect the types of bugs in our gut and our overall gut health, including the foods we eat. “But men don’t need to fill their shopping trolleys with yoghurt because it’s too early to say from this study whether eating more yoghurt could reduce the risk of bowel cancer. However, there is good evidence that you can reduce your risk by eating more foods high in fibre, like wholegrain bread or brown rice, and cutting down on processed and red meat.” Bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the UK, with almost 42,000 diagnoses annually.


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Just one in five women at risk of breast cancer know alcohol increases the danger

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 15:30

Just one in five women attending breast cancer clinics are aware alcohol increases the risk of disease - and half of staff have no idea. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with 54,000 diagnoses and 11,000 deaths annually. Scientists estimate that alcohol consumption causes around one in ten cases of the disease. But a study by the University of Southampton found that women at breast screening clinics, and at appointments for those with symptoms of disease, were largely unaware of the links. And just half of staff working in such settings knew about the connection, the study found. The study, published in BMJ Online, involved 102 women undergoing mammograms, 103 at clinics because of symptoms and 33 clinical staff. About | Breast cancer Just 16 per cent of those in the screening group and 23 per cent in clinic group knew alcohol is a risk factor. And only 52 per cent of staff knew alcohol was a risk. Researchers said advising women about the risks when they attended sessions could be a “teachable moment” when they were more likely to listen to health messages about the dangers of alcohol. Thirty per cent of women said they would be more likely to attend screening if it included information on how to cut their risks of cancer. But most staff felt it would make no difference to attendance, with four in five listing disadvantages to such an approach, with fears that patients would feel “blamed” for developing the disease. Study author Professor Julia Sinclair, of Southampton University, said: "Over 20 per cent of women aged 45 to 64 reportedly drink more than 14 units per week, so any intervention to reduce population level consumption could have a significant influence on breast cancer rates, as well as help to manage the side effects of treatment and improve the overall health of survivors."


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How I Medically Transitioned As a Transgender Man With a Heart Defect

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 15:28

Alexander De Sacia, a transgender man, explains how he handled his medical transition while managing his congenital heart defect.


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Naval Expert: Why Russia Never Built Lots of Aircraft Carriers

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 15:20

The aviation capability of the Russian navy is dangling by a thread. Kuznetsov is old and in poor condition, and no carrier is even close to be laid down. Historically a land power, the Soviet Union grappled with the idea of a large naval aviation arm for most of its history, eventually settling on a series of hybrid aircraft carriers. Big plans for additional ships died with the Soviet collapse, but Russia inherited one large aircraft carrier at the end of the Cold War—that remains in service today. Although many of the problems that wracked the naval aviation projects of the Soviet Union remain today, the Russian navy nevertheless sports one of the more active aircraft carriers in the world.Recommended: Air War: Stealth F-22 Raptor vs. F-14 Tomcat (That Iran Still Flies)Recommended: A New Report Reveals Why There Won't Be Any 'New' F-22 RaptorsRecommended: How an ‘Old’ F-15 Might Kill Russia’s New Stealth FighterHistory of Russian Naval Aviation


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Flesh-Eating Bacteria on New Jersey Beaches Are Rising Because of Climate Change—What You Need to Know

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 15:14

Here’s how higher ocean water temperatures negatively affect your health.


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China's Most Advanced Big Brother Experiment Is a Bureaucratic Mess

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 15:00

(Bloomberg) -- The city of Suzhou, known as “the Venice of the East” for its web of intricate waterways, captured the imagination of Marco Polo when he journeyed through China more than seven centuries ago.Today it’s drawing attention for another grand project: a sprawling network of databases designed to track the behavior of China’s population. Sitting next to Shanghai with an economy larger than Finland’s, Suzhou was one of a dozen places chosen in 2018 by President Xi Jinping’s government to run a social-credit trial, which can reward or punish citizens for their behavior.The system, dubbed “Osmanthus” after the fragrant flower the city uses as an emblem, collects data on nearly two dozen metrics, including marital status, education level and social-security payments. Authorities have given it national awards even as Western politicians like U.S. Vice President Mike Pence lambaste social credit as ushering in an Orwellian dystopia that could serve as a model for authoritarian regimes around the globe. But dozens of interviews with the people most affected by the system paint a nuanced picture of the technology in its early stages. Few of the entrepreneurs, volunteers, public servants and other Suzhou residents surveyed said they had even heard of Osmanthus, which is supposed to help shape laws, regulations and standards across China by 2020.China’s Radical Plan to Judge Each Citizen’s Behavior: QuickTakeSuzhou’s experience raises questions about the dozens of similar scoring projects that local cities are now rolling out. If residents are unaware of a system designed to change their behavior for the better, then what’s the point of having it? And if it’s struggling to take off in a city lauded by authorities, what are the chances it can be implemented effectively across the nation anytime soon?“China has an interest in overstating its capacity to collect and analyze data, like they overstate their capacity to monitor with surveillance cameras and facial recognition,” said Jeremy Daum, a senior fellow at the Paul Tsai China Center at Yale Law School. “They want people to believe that misconduct will get caught.”A three-story brown and white building near the city center is the public face of Suzhou’s social-credit system. Here individuals can ask questions about their scores.On a recent Monday afternoon, the building was largely empty. Two staff shuffled papers and typed at computers, while six seats reserved for visitors were vacant. One woman who entered was lost and asked for directions. The lone self-service machine, emblazoned with logos for Osmanthus and state-owned telecoms company China Unicom, was unplugged.A female official in jeans and a t-shirt, who only gave her family name Xi, said about 10 people come in each day. Most are small-business owners who want to verify that they’ve been removed from a financial credit blacklist after paying off a debt. She said she’s hardly ever seen anyone come in to check their social-credit score.Proponents of the system says it hews closely to the financial scores pioneered by William Fair and Earl Isaac in the U.S. in the mid-1950s. Today, FICO scores form the basis of the vast majority of loans made to individuals in the U.S. — with occasional debates over how they’re formulated and whether consumers have enough access to them.“People could end up living in fear, worrying that they are being watched all the time.”But China’s social-credit scores arguably go a step further by using the country’s vast surveillance network — public CCTV cameras, payment systems and more — to monitor citizens. While good behavior — such as volunteering, paying bills on time or avoiding fines for littering — is supposed to be rewarded with financial perks, bad behavior can abruptly leave residents without access to financing and public services.Osmanthus collects data on individuals from around 20 government departments, including social security and civil affairs, according to the local administration. Citizens start out with a neutral 100 points and can build them up to a maximum of 200 through good behavior. Like many other provinces trialing the system, Suzhou hasn’t yet introduced rules to define bad behavior, or the number of points that can be deducted.But perks for good behavior also are unclear. Lu Wenting, a Suzhou resident who says she does about 24 hours of volunteer work each week, said that she had never heard of Osmanthus, even though it’s supposed to grant public transport benefits to those with high scores. She found out her own score was a healthy “123” after Bloomberg reporters helped her look it up on the WeChat app run by Tencent Holdings Ltd.About one in eight of the 13 million people monitored in Suzhou had a score above 100 as of last August, according to local media reports. Only 4,731 were below 100, and all were so-called defaulters who hadn’t paid back loans or had failed to obey court rulings. That leaves more than 11 million people with scores at the baseline.Still, the idea of punishment is already sparking worries. A citizen in Yiwu, a city in neighboring Zhejiang province that is also running a trial, said he was denied a bank loan because a traffic cop deducted three points from his score for failing to give way to pedestrians crossing a street. Residents with a score of at least 100 points qualify for “civilization loans” with favorable interest rates.“People from lower levels of society could break rules without knowing and find their scores lowered and get shut out of more and more opportunities,” said Chen Shicai, a resident in Suzhou, expressing worries that social credit could worsen inequality in a country that already grapples with huge wealth divisions.One problem is how to integrate social credit into existing legal systems to ensure there are checks and balances to prevent abuse. China’s use of technology and informants among the Uighur minority groups in the far western province of Xinjiang suggest that the programs could become more oppressive as they develop.“I worry that regulations may become too specific, such as parking in the wrong spot,” said Su Su, an insurance saleswoman in Suzhou. “People could end up living in fear, worrying that they are being watched all the time.” Five provinces or municipalities — Shanghai, Zhejiang, Hebei, Hubei and Shaanxi — have established local credit regulations, but there are no national rules. Zhejiang and Shanghai placed clear restrictions on data collection that exclude personal information on religious beliefs, genetics, fingerprints, blood types and medical history.“While most of the trials are leaning towards encouraging people with convenience and perks, local authorities need to exercise caution when it comes to punishment," said Han Jiaping, director of the Credit Research Institute affiliated with the Ministry of Commerce. “Government at all levels shouldn’t over-punish and infringe people’s privacy and legitimate rights.”Another wrinkle is that many residents see more value in competing systems. At the 105-year-old Suzhou Library, citizens with high Osmanthus scores are supposed to be able to get longer book loan periods. But library staff said most people checked out books using their Zhima Credit number, a private credit score from Alibaba Group’s Ant Financial. Few people even ask about their Osmanthus score.“It’s more like a vanity project,” said Diao Yun, a Suzhou resident who works for a private company. “There’s no promotion of the system in the city — no billboards, no ads or public campaign as far as I see. It’s distant from people’s daily lives.”Cities and officials looking to build and implement a social-credit system face a bewildering array of official guidelines and documents from the State Council and other central and regional government bodies. Those rules relate to everything from assessing creditworthiness to punishing cultural performances on the internet that have a “heinous” social impact.In Suzhou, the main roadblock to promoting the system is inter-department squabbling over data sharing and who will pay for perks, according to a report in the state-owned Suzhou Daily. The paper said only 30 of the 70 departments are sending data directly to the platform, with others worried about transferring information without a legal requirement.“People could end up living in fear, worrying that they are being watched all the time.”Those teething problems mean that many residents in Suzhou are unaware of the system. None of the staff questioned in the subway, parks and museum knew anything about the scoring system or alleged perks, such as priority non-emergency service at hospitals.Another problem is at the national level. Xi and his team are engaged in an escalating trade war with the Trump administration that threatens to further hurt growth as companies get caught in the line of fire.It’s not a priority among China’s top leaders to push through a nationwide social-credit scoring system now even if Suzhou and other localities can set up workable models, said Zhang Jian, an associate government professor at Peking University.“President Xi and his government have been caught up ‘fire fighting’ internal and external pressures since last year,” Zhang said. “I doubt the party leaders are willing to expend the time, energy and political capital to roll out the plan.”  To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Dandan Li in Beijing at dli395@bloomberg.netSharon Chen in Singapore at schen462@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Jodi Schneider at jschneider50@bloomberg.net, Brendan ScottAdam MajendieAlice TruongFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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US air quality is slipping after years of improvement

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 13:39

After decades of improvement, America's air may not be getting any cleaner. Over the last two years the nation had more polluted air days than just a few years earlier, federal data shows. While it remains unclear whether this is the beginning of a trend, health experts say it's troubling to see air quality progress stagnate.


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Airbus seeks new partners to expand in U.S. space market

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 13:31

Airbus' defence division is looking for new partners to expand its presence in the growing U.S. space market, and could potentially build components for a lunar programme there, Airbus Defence and Space Chief Executive Dirk Hoke told Reuters. Airbus is ramping up production of more than 640 refrigerator-sized satellites for start-up telecoms services provider OneWeb at a facility in Florida, that Hoke said would already give it some leverage in the U.S. market. The company could also produce components in the United States for its European Support Module, a critical part of NASA's Orion spacecraft, if that is modified as a module to access the moon, Hoke told Reuters at the Paris Airshow.


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Airbus seeks new partners to expand in U.S. space market

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 13:31

Airbus' defense division is looking for new partners to expand its presence in the growing U.S. space market, and could potentially build components for a lunar program there, Airbus Defense and Space Chief Executive Dirk Hoke told Reuters. Airbus is ramping up production of more than 640 refrigerator-sized satellites for start-up telecoms services provider OneWeb at a facility in Florida, that Hoke said would already give it some leverage in the U.S. market. The company could also produce components in the United States for its European Support Module, a critical part of NASA's Orion spacecraft, if that is modified as a module to access the moon, Hoke told Reuters at the Paris Airshow.


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Tesla to Revamp Asia Business Structure to Focus on China

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 13:22

(Bloomberg) -- Tesla Inc. is revamping its organization in Asia to put more focus on China as the company prepares to start manufacturing in the world’s largest electric-car market, people familiar with the matter said.The company is dismantling its Asia Pacific business unit and forming a new division for Greater China that will cover the mainland as well as Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau, the people said, asking not to be named as the plan hasn’t been announced publicly. Tom Zhu, who took over as vice president of APAC operations from Robin Ren in 2018, will head the division, they said.Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk is betting on China, Tesla’s biggest market after the U.S., to boost sales and restore investor confidence that has slumped along with the company’s stock this year. Tesla is building a factory in Shanghai that is slated to start operating later this year and bolster competitiveness in a country crowded with hundreds of electric-vehicle rivals.Zhu will continue to lead the Shanghai factory operation, which he took charge of last year after managing other aspects of Tesla’s China business, including the rollout of its supercharger stations. He will also head sales and training for the country and a number of other teams, the people said. The Asia-Pacific region’s other teams will report to Tesla’s head office in Palo Alto, California, they said.Tesla representatives in the U.S. didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. Neither did Musk. A Tesla representative in China directed Bloomberg to the company’s U.S. headquarters. Zhu didn’t respond to several attempts to reach him by phone, and Ren didn’t respond to a text message.The need for Tesla to expand beyond the U.S. was highlighted by its latest quarterly results, which missed analysts’ projections. The halving of a federal tax incentive for Tesla purchases starting in January dragged on U.S. demand in the quarter, and Tesla struggled to offset that drop by starting deliveries of the Model 3 in Europe and China.Tesla shares climbed as much as 4.3% Tuesday and were up 0.6% to $226.39 as of 3:20 p.m. in New York. The stock is still down 32% this year.(Updates with Zhu’s background in fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Yan Zhang and Dana Hull.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Haze Fan in Beijing at hfan40@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, ;Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Ville Heiskanen, Emma O'BrienFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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RSPB accused of hypocrisy after it allows energy firm to build power station in nature reserve

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 12:00

The RSPB has been accused of hypocrisy after allowing  a power station to be built on one of its nature reserves, with noise pollution from the construction likely to affect rare birds in protected areas. Plans for the power plant have been released by Statera at the RSPB Saltholme reserve near Middlesborough, adjacent to government-designated special bird protection areas. The lowest acceptable noise for birds is, according to experts, around 50 decibels. Construction, planning documents show, will cause noise pollution levels of 75db at the potential Special Protection Area nearby and 65db at the Special Protection Area. These are areas of high ecological significance and contain red-listed birds including curlews and lapwings. Excessive noise can prohibit birds from breeding and avoiding predators, according to a study published last year in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Some have also pointed out that the bird charity has called for the government to commit to a zero fossil fuel future, and supported climate change movement Extinction Rebellion - but has allowed a fossil fuel power station to be built on the reserve it manages. Curlews can be seen in the area Credit: Sandra Standbridge/Moment RF  Former cricket star Sir Ian Botham said: "The public expect environmental charities to act green as well as talk green. They will struggle to understand how the RSPB both supports Extinction Rebellion and yet is renting out a bird reserve for a fossil fuel power station. It will be interesting to find out how much Statera will pay the RSPB over the lifetime of this project.” “You could hardly make this up,” said local resident Maria Shannon. "The RSPB says there is a climate emergency - and then takes money to build a fossil fuel power station in a bird reserve which is so noisy that it could harm the birds.”  However, the RSPB has argued that the area of the reserve in which the power station will be built is not one of high ecological significance. The organisation added that any noise will be monitored on an ongoing basis, and regulated by the Environment Agency and currently completely complies. A spokesperson for the RSPB added: “The RSPB wouldn’t allow the proposed development to go ahead if we thought it would have an impact on the local wildlife. At our Saltholme reserve, we have, with the support of landowners the Teesside Environmental Trust, created a haven for nature in the heart of one of the UK’s most industrialised areas. “The RSPB supports calls for the UK to become net zero on carbon emissions by 2050. This is not something that can be achieved overnight, and facilities such as the one proposed for Saltholme will be important in helping the energy sector to transition, by giving short periods of generation to cover peak load periods whilst providing a modern and more efficient source of energy than large and inefficient powerplants. This is not the answer long-term, but we believe it is a step in the right direction.” Oliver Troup of Statera Energy said that noise levels would be compliant with Environment Agency rules and that their energy plants are high efficiency, and produce the lowest cost, lowest carbon, back-up power at the fastest rate possible which is a key requirement for the grid at times of ‘peak power’.


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Trump’s Climate Denial Is Helping to Put His Own Businesses Underwater

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 11:54

The president is holding his first official 2020 fundraiser at a Trump resort that will likely be swallowed by sea-level rise in the coming decades


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Here’s Why Scientists Are “Fingerprinting” Baby Sea Turtles

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 11:54

There’s a lot we don’t know about sea turtle reproduction. Fortunately, NOAA’s brave detectives are on the case.


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Google Pledges $1 Billion to Tackle Bay Area Housing Crisis

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 11:36

(Bloomberg) -- Google pledged $1 billion over the next 10 years to try to address an affordable housing crisis California’s Bay Area.The tech giant will re-purpose $750 million of its own land for residential use, allowing the development of at least 15,000 new homes, Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai said in a blog post on Tuesday. Another $250 million will go to incentives for developers to build at least 5,000 affordable housing units.The success of Google and other Silicon Valley technology companies has contributed to massive housing cost increases in the San Francisco Bay Area. The firms employ tens of thousands of high-earners who have bought or rented homes, leaving fewer options for poor and middle-income residents. Meanwhile, the supply of new houses and apartments has not kept up with demand.“Our goal is to help communities succeed over the long term, and make sure that everyone has access to opportunity, whether or not they work in tech,” Pichai said. He noted that just 3,000 homes were built in the South Bay area last year.Silicon Valley is the most expensive housing market in the country, with a median existing-home price of $1.2 million. The San Francisco and Oakland metro area is second with a $930,000 median, according to the National Association of Realtors.Google’s financial commitment is significant, but more companies and organizations will need to pitch in to really change housing affordability in the Bay Area, said Ray Bramson, chief impact officer for homelessness advocacy organization Destination: Home.In Santa Clara County, which encompasses San Jose, Mountain View and Palo Alto, there is a shortage of more than 35,000 affordable housing units, Bramson said. There will also need to be infrastructure improvements to handle population growth, he added.“There’s a huge, huge challenge our community is facing,” he said. “It’s going to take a tremendous amount of work.”Listen to Bloomberg’s Decrypted Podcast on Silicon Valley’s van dwellers.One challenge for Google will be persuading local towns to support rezoning land for housing. Because of a 1978 measure that limits property-tax increases on homes, municipalities generally get more revenue from commercial development than residential, according to Margaret O’Mara, a University of Washington history professor and author of the forthcoming book, "The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America."Google isn’t the first tech giant to throw money at the housing crisis. Microsoft Corp. said in January it would spend $500 million to develop affordable housing and alleviate homelessness in the Seattle area, near its headquarters.“These are not altruistic, non-profits, they’re for-profit companies," said O’Mara. "They’re putting money into something that they’re going to benefit from not just in terms of the good press.”The philanthropy started by Facebook Inc.’s Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan is also backing an effort to address the housing shortage in the San Francisco Bay Area.(Updates with outside comment from housing activist in sixth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Kara Wetzel.To contact the reporters on this story: Gerrit De Vynck in New York at gdevynck@bloomberg.net;Noah Buhayar in Seattle at nbuhayar@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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Apollo astronauts celebrate 50 years since first moon landing

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:59

Three astronauts instrumental in the groundbreaking U.S. space program of the 1960s and 70s gathered at the Paris Air Show on Tuesday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, the mission that first put a man on the moon. Walter Cunningham, 87, who was part of the Apollo 7 mission, Al Worden, 87, who flew with Apollo 15, and Charlie Duke, 83, who walked on the moon with Apollo 16, recounted their extra-terrestrial experiences before a captive airshow audience. Worden, who orbited the moon alone for days in 1971, holds the feat of having been the world's most isolated human, while Cunningham is notable for being part of a team that talked back to Mission Control in 1968, getting them blacklisted from future flights.


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It's 'Lazy Medicine' When Doctors Blame Everything on Your Weight

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:52

Elizabeth Pidgeon describes what she calls, "lazy medicine," as doctors continue to blame most of her health conditions on her weight.


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Indian family branches out with novel tree house

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:50

When the Kesharwanis decided to branch out and expand their family home, they came up with a novel way of dealing with an ancient giant fig tree in their garden -- they built the house around it. "We are nature lovers and my father insisted that we keep the tree," said Yogesh Kesharwani, whose parent built the house in 1994 with the help of an engineer friend. The fig tree, known as peepal in Hindi, is considered sacred by many in India and cutting one down is considered inauspicious.


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Apollo astronauts celebrate 50 years since first moon landing

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:47

Three astronauts instrumental in the groundbreaking U.S. space programme of the 1960s and 70s gathered at the Paris Air Show on Tuesday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, the mission that first put a man on the moon. Walter Cunningham, 87, who was part of the Apollo 7 mission, Al Worden, 87, who flew with Apollo 15, and Charlie Duke, 83, who walked on the moon with Apollo 16, recounted their extra-terrestrial experiences before a captive airshow audience. Worden, who orbited the moon alone for days in 1971, holds the feat of having been the world's most isolated human, while Cunningham is notable for being part of a team that talked back to Mission Control in 1968, getting them blacklisted from future flights.


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Eight EU countries to phase out coal by 2030

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:26

Eight of the EU's 28 countries have pledged to phase out coal for electricity production by 2030 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, officials said Tuesday. The European Commission, the EU's executive arm, received the pledges as contributions to the bloc's efforts to deliver on the 2015 Paris climate agreement. "More and more member states are making the political commitment to phase out coal in the next decade," EU climate and energy commissioner Miguel Arias Canete said.


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