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Updated: 1 hour 42 min ago

Resources giants ramp up calls for Australia carbon tax

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 20:07

Energy giant Woodside has joined the world's largest miners in calling for Australia to re-introduce a tax on carbon emissions as pressure mounts on the conservative government to act on climate change by curbing pollution. Australia is considered one of the world's worst per capita greenhouse gas polluters, and is a heavy user of coal-fired power. Former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull was ousted in a party coup in August, in part triggered by his effects to embed in law carbon emission targets agreed at the 2015 UN climate conference in Paris.


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The man who battled the flames to save his corner of Paradise

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 20:00

Paradise (United States) (AFP) - By all accounts, retired carpenter Brad Weldon should have evacuated his home in Paradise as the flames approached.


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President Donald Trump Celebrates Diwali at the White House

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 19:52

Several administration officials gathered in the oval office while the President lit ceremonial Diya candles.


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Calls For a Ban on Child Boxing Grow in Thailand After the Death of a 13-Year-Old Boy

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 19:26

Anucha Kochana was fighting to earn money for his own schooling


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How Blue Origin space venture’s HQ2, HQ3 and HQ4 blazed a trail for Amazon HQ plan

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 15:59

The process that Amazon went through to choose New York, Northern Virginia and Nashville as key sites for expansion isn’t the first HQ2 exercise for CEO Jeff Bezos: You could argue that the pattern was set when Bezos’ Blue Origin space venture decided where it’d manufacture and launch its New Glenn rocket. Blue Origin’s selection process produced far less hype than the yearlong contest that Amazon conducted, and far fewer jobs were at stake. But like the HQ2/3/4 arrangement announced today, the exercise ended up producing multiple winners — as well as disappointed suitors. The saga of Blue Origin’s expansion starts… Read More


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Wolf taken to Isle Royale National Park this fall dies

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 15:56

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A gray wolf relocated this fall from mainland Minnesota to Isle Royale National Park has died of unknown causes, officials said Tuesday, a minor setback in a multiyear plan to rebuild the predator species on the Lake Superior archipelago.


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Amazon Created Excitement in Middle America With the HQ2 Contest. Then It Picked New York and Washington

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 15:45

Big metros on the East Coast won the day, though less obvious cities had made the short list


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The world’s most perfect kilogram is about to get the boot

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 15:33

You may have never heard of the solid metal cylinder known as Le Grand K, but it's most definitely impacted your life in countless ways. Le Grand K is kept in Paris, where it's been for over 120 years, and its purpose is to simply exist.

You see, Le Grand K is the most perfect kilogram on the planet. For weight measurements to mean anything, every scale has to be calibrated on the exact same standard, and that's where this particular piece of platinum-iridium alloy comes in. Now, after serving in its post for well over a century, Le Grand K is being retired.

As CNN reports, the relic has done its job for a while, but the nature of matter itself ultimately doomed it to eventual expiration. Over time, the piece of metal sheds atoms. A single atom, or even a hundred, would be virtually unnoticeable, but after 120+ years, it's lost enough atoms that it's not nearly as perfect as it once was.

This coming Friday, the international officials whose job it is to maintain accurate weight measurements around the globe will vote on the decision to remove Le Grand K from its post and replace it with something even more reliable: the Planck constant. The Planck constant is a natural constant that can be measured with a special instrument and, because it's part of the fabric of our reality, it never changes.

For you and I and just about everyone else, we won't really notice any difference. Our everyday lives will be essentially unchanged by the shifting of the weight measurement standard, but the change will be a big deal for organizations and industries that rely on hyper-accurate weight readings.


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The 2018 Elections Saw Record Midterm Turnout

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 14:44

The 2018 Elections Saw Record Midterm Turnout


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Incoming Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Joins Climate Change Activists in Protest Outside Nancy Pelosi's Office

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 14:44

Democratic Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York has joined about 200 climate-change activists as they stage a protest at the office of House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi.


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Trump Supporter Banned From Disney World for Waving 'Trump 2020' Sign on Splash Mountain

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 14:30

Dion Cini has been permanently barred from the theme park


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CIA considered potential truth serum for terror suspects

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 13:53

Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was "possibly worth a try." But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The existence of the drug research program — dubbed "Project Medication" — is disclosed in a once-classified report that was provided to the American Civil Liberties Union under a judge's order and was released by the organization Tuesday.


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State says permit for refinery near national park justified

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 12:22

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota's Health Department did not improperly discount its own concerns about pollution from a proposed oil refinery near Theodore Roosevelt National Park when it permitted the project earlier this year, attorneys for the agency and for the developer argue.


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Neanderthals were no more violent than modern humans, study suggests

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 11:00

The rehabilitation of Neanderthals has taken another step forward after scientists discovered they were no more violent than modern humans and could probably hunt just as well. Previously, studies of Neanderthal skulls showed high rates of head injuries suggesting they were constantly getting into scrapes with large animals, and each other. The evidence seemed to imply they had chaotic social structures, leading to violent infighting and such poor hunting techniques - relying on close contact weapons - that they were often mauled by cave bears or hyenas. But a review of the evidence has shown modern man had a similar numbers of wounds, showing their lifestyles were probably quite similar. “Our findings refute the hypothesis that Neanderthals were more prone to head injuries than modern humans,” said Professor Katerina Harvati, of the Institute of Evolution and Ecology, University of Tubingen in Germany. “We therefore believe that the commonly cited Neanderthal behaviors leading to high injury levels, such as violent behavior and inferior hunting capabilities, must be reconsidered. “Overall, however, our results suggest that Neanderthal lifestyles were not more dangerous than those of our ancestors, early modern Europeans.” Neanderthals had no more skull injuries than humans Credit: kolvenbach / Alamy Neanderthals, lived in western Eurasia from 400,000 until they were wiped out around 40,000 years ago allowing modern humans to flourish. It was widely believed that humans simply outcompeted them, but the new study suggests a different reason could be to blame. Researchers trawled through a newly compiled database of more than 800 fossil specimens, which included 114 human skulls and 90 Neanderthals,  both with and without injuries. They carried out rigorous statistical modelling accounting for sex, age at death, geography and state of preservation of the bones. Results showed that males were more frequently injured than females among both Neanderthals and early modern humans, suggesting a division of labour. But there was no difference in the frequency of fractures. Neanderthal (left) and modern human skeleton. Neanderthals have commonly be considered to show high incidences of trauma compared to modern humans. Credit: Ian Tattersall The only difference discovered was the age of the injuries, with greater skull wounds among young Neanderthal skeletons, under the age of 30,  whereas Upper Palaeolithic modern humans maintained consistent injury rates across age “This could mean that Neanderthals were more likely to be injured at a younger age than Upper Paleolithic modern humans,” added Judith Beier, of Tubingen University, first author of the study. The research was published in the journal Nature. Writing in a linked editorial Marta Lahr of Cambridge University said: "This implies that Neanderthal trauma does not require its own special explanations, and that risk and danger were as much a part of the life of Neanderthals as they were of our own evolutionary past. "The result adds to growing evidence that Neanderthals had much in common with early human groups."


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Spain wants to ban sale of petrol and diesel cars from 2040

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 10:57

Spain said Tuesday it wants to outlaw the sale of new diesel and petrol cars from 2040, the latest European country to target polluting vehicles to try to cut emissions. Socialist Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez's government included the proposal in a draft document for an energy transition law which also calls for Spain to completely decarbonise its economy by 2050. The announcement comes a year after Britain and France both pledged to ban new diesel and petrol cars by 2040, while Norway is aiming to end the use of all cars running on fossil fuels by 2025.


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Greece unearths remnants of ancient city of Tenea

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 10:52

Greek archaeologists have discovered jewellery, dozens of coins and remnants of a housing settlement affirming the location of an ancient city thought to have been founded by survivors of the Trojan War in the 12th or 13th century BCE. Excavations close to the village of Chiliomodi in Greece's southern Peloponnese region indicated the presence of the wealthy ancient city of Tenea, the Culture Ministry said in a statement. "It is significant that the remnants of the city, the paved roads, the architectural structure, came to light," Eleni Korka, who is in charge of the dig, told Reuters.


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Irish Authorities Are Investigating UFOs Reported By 3 Commercial Pilots on a Single Night

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 10:31

Irish authorities are investigating potential UFO sightings by multiple commercial airline pilots.


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Forecast much better for rescheduled rocket launch on Friday

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 10:24

A rocket will streak across the sky over the mid-Atlantic early Friday morning as NASA launches a spacecraft from the Virginia coast.


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No, Amazon Didn't Just Rename a City 'National Landing.' Here's the Deal.

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 10:01

Amazon revealed the location of its headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, but people are confused over the apparent rename of Crystal City.


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Greece unearths remnants of ancient city of Tenea

Tue, 11/13/2018 - 09:59

Greek archaeologists have discovered jewelry, dozens of coins and remnants of a housing settlement affirming the location of an ancient city thought to have been founded by survivors of the Trojan War in the 12th or 13th century BCE. Excavations close to the village of Chiliomodi in Greece's southern Peloponnese region indicated the presence of the wealthy ancient city of Tenea, the Culture Ministry said in a statement. "It is significant that the remnants of the city, the paved roads, the architectural structure, came to light," Eleni Korka, who is in charge of the dig, told Reuters.


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