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Celgene (CELG) Presents Data on Pipeline Candidates at ASCO

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 07:00

Celgene (CELG) presents data on myelofibrosis candidate from a phase II study and an oncology candidate at ASCO.


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Cervical Cancer Can Be Prevented. Here's How.

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 06:35

Since the widespread adoption of the Pap test (also called a Pap smear) during the 1960s, cervical cancer deaths in the U.S. have plummeted by about 70 percent, according to the American Cancer S...


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Cervical Cancer Can Be Prevented. Here's How.

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 06:31

Since the widespread adoption of the Pap test (also called a Pap smear) during the 1960s, cervical cancer deaths in the U.S. have plummeted by about 70 percent, according to the American Cancer S...


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Trump administration tries to block youth lawsuit claiming ‘there is no constitutional right to a stable climate system’

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 06:30

A group of young Americans who have spent nearly four years trying to compel the federal government to take action on climate change found themselves back in court on Tuesday, arguing that their unprecedented lawsuit should move forward.The Trump administration, like the Obama administration before it, was there to argue once again that the lawsuit should be tossed out before it ever goes to trial, both because the plaintiffs do not meet the legal requirements to bring such a suit and because "there is no fundamental constitutional right to a 'stable climate system.' "The lawsuit, filed in 2015 by 21 young people who argue that the failure of government leaders to combat climate change violates their constitutional right to a clean environment, had been scheduled to go to trial last fall before a district judge in Oregon.But it was delayed at the last minute while the Supreme Court considered an emergency request from the government.In early November, the court refused to grant the Trump administration's plea to stop the case before trial, instead sending it back to the US Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit.That is where the case, known as Juliana v United States, got its latest moment in court on Tuesday afternoon."It is a case that is a dagger at the separation of powers," Jeffrey Bossert Clark, an assistant attorney general for the Justice Department, argued before a panel of three appeals court judges. He added, "This is a suit that is designed to circumvent a whole bunch of statutes."Mr Clark reiterated the arguments that the government has long made in the case: that the lawsuit amounts to an "end run" around the authorities of Congress and federal agencies and that the remedies the plaintiffs are seeking would be unwieldy, unrealistic and unwarranted.But Julia Olson, the attorney for the plaintiffs and executive director of Our Children's Trust, insisted that her clients - a majority of whom are now old enough to vote - had been deprived of their fundamental rights as a result of government policies that fuel global warming.The group's goal is to compel the government to scale back its support for fossil fuel extraction and production and to support policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions."When our great-grandchildren look back on the 21st century, they will see that government-sanctioned climate destruction was the constitutional issue of this century," Ms Olson said."We must be a nation that applies the rule of law to harmful government conduct that threatens the lives of our children, so that they can grow up free and pursue their happiness. That is what the founders intended."The three judges presiding over Tuesday's hearing grilled both attorneys on the particulars of their arguments, and they seemed to wrestle with whether the courts could make such sweeping demands of the government."Look, you're arguing for us to break new ground," judge Andrew Hurwitz told Ms Olson at one point. "You may be right. I'm sympathetic to the problems you point out. But you shouldn't say this is just an ordinary suit. . . . You're asking us to do a lot of new stuff, aren't you?""We're asking the court to apply bedrock constitutional law and principles to a wholly new set of facts," Ms Olson replied.In a congressionally-mandated report last fall, the federal government detailed how the effects of climate change, including deadly wildfires, increasingly debilitating hurricanes and heat waves, are already battering the United States - and how the risk of more such catastrophes is worsening.Produced by 13 federal departments and agencies, along with outside researchers, the National Climate Assessment stretched more than 1,000 pages.Its authors argued that climate change "is transforming where and how we live and presents growing challenges to human health and quality of life, the economy, and the natural systems that support us."The Supreme Court's three-page order in November, which sent the case back to the 9th Circuit, noted the government's assertion that the "suit is based on an assortment of unprecedented legal theories, such as a substantive due process right to certain climate conditions, and an equal protection right to live in the same climate as enjoyed by prior generations."The justices acknowledged that the 9th Circuit had previously turned down the government but said those decisions came when there was a "likelihood that plaintiffs' claims would narrow as the case progressed."That no longer seems the case, the unsigned opinion said, suggesting the possibility that the 9th Circuit might see things differently now.The order also left open the possibility that the government could ultimately return to the Supreme Court.In briefs to the Supreme Court, solicitor general Noel Francisco wrote that "the assertion of sweeping new fundamental rights to certain climate conditions has no basis in the nation's history and tradition - and no place in federal court."Even before Tuesday, lawyers in two administrations had made similar arguments in lower courts. But again and again, judges allowed the case to proceed.In an interview last fall, Ms Olson was optimistic that the young plaintiffs will get the trial they seek."We've been confident throughout this case that we would get to trial, and I believe we will get to trial," she said."We have overcome everything the government has thrown at us. It is not luck. It is the strength of the case and the strength of the evidence and the strength of the legal arguments we are making."The Washington Post


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Jay Inslee Proposes Targeting Climate Deniers Overseas With U.S. Anti-Corruption Laws

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 06:20

The Washington governor ups the ante on climate proposals as his 2020 Democratic presidential rivals are announcing theirs.


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10 Jaw-Dropping Numbers About Cancer Drug Development -- and What They Mean for Investors

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 06:15

There's more good news with the fight against cancer than you might think.


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2020 hopeful Inslee: Build US foreign policy around climate

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 06:14

Democratic presidential hopeful Jay Inslee wants the U.S. to shape all foreign policy decisions around a commitment to combat the climate crisis, including willingness to use tariffs, other trade incentives and international finance rules to compel other nations to reduce carbon pollution. "Our goal is to re-establish American leadership in the fight against climate crisis and use all the tools in the international relations toolbox," Inslee told The Associated Press.


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Presidential hopeful Inslee unveils plan to reclaim U.S. leadership on climate issue

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 06:04

Democratic contenders vying for the party's nomination to take on Republican President Donald Trump in the 2020 election are seeking to distinguish themselves with the strongest proposals to halt global warming, a top issue in the Democratic race. Inslee, who is seeking to break out of the bottom of the crowded Democratic pack, has made climate change the central issue in his campaign. Several other Democratic candidates, including front-runner Joe Biden on Tuesday, have outlined similar goals of eliminating U.S. emissions of the greenhouse gases scientists blame for the effects of climate change, like sea level rise, droughts, floods and more frequent powerful storms.


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Companies lag in climate-related disclosures: G20 Task Force

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 06:02

Companies are failing to disclose sufficient detail about how exposed they are to the potential risks of climate change, a global task force said in a report on Wednesday. Many investors have called on companies to provide better communication on how climate change could impact their businesses, amid concerns that assets are being mispriced because the full scale of the risk is not being factored in. "Given the speed at which changes are needed to limit the rise in the global average temperature — across a wide range of sectors — more companies need to consider the potential impact of climate change and disclose material findings," the report said.


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Iovance and Amgen Are Making Cancer History

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 06:00

Iovance shares have climbed more than 50 percent since its data was first released in mid-May, including a 10 percent surge on Monday (the company presented at the Chicago conference on Friday). Amgen shares climbed more than 4 percent this week, while Mirati Therapeteutics Inc. – a smaller rival that’s working on a similar lung cancer drug to Amgen’s surged more than 45 percent in that same time. It’s easy to over-hype initial results, and there have been many instances where thrilling early data and a ballooning stock price deteriorated over time. In the case of Iovance and Amgen, though, the excitement is warranted, and the impact should extend beyond a few amped-up investors.


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Presidential hopeful Inslee unveils plan to reclaim U.S. leadership on climate issue

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 05:12

Democratic contenders vying for the party's nomination to take on Republican President Donald Trump in the 2020 election are seeking to distinguish themselves with the strongest proposals to halt global warming, a top issue in the Democratic race. Inslee, who is seeking to break out of the bottom of the crowded Democratic pack, has made climate change the central issue in his campaign. Several other Democratic candidates, including front-runner Joe Biden on Tuesday, have outlined similar goals of eliminating U.S. emissions of the greenhouse gases scientists blame for the effects of climate change, like sea level rise, droughts, floods and more frequent powerful storms.


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The U.S. Navy Might Have Found a New Way to Kill Enemy Submarines

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 05:11

Should an enemy submarine surface well beyond undersea or surface drone detection range and send intelligence to attack platforms - US Navy platforms could be vulnerable in some instances. Fortified by targeting data from well beyond the horizon, enemy subs, planes and ships might, in this case, be well-positioned for a coordinated strike.However, should an interwoven web of Navy surveillance assets track and share vital information, coordinated surface, air and undersea drones could sustain an unprecedented advantage -- and a new attack synergy could actually begin to transform maritime warfare.Enemy mines, surface ships, small boats and submarines might be detected more quickly, but, perhaps of greater importance, cross-domain drone connectivity would completely change the sensor-to-shooter kill chain. With this in mind, Navy weapons developers have put this initiative on the fast track, with the hope of rapidly networking its fleet of surface, air and undersea drones.Submarine hunting with Textron’s Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USVs) is already breaking through to a new level of detection and attack technology, laying a foundation of progress from which to build toward a new horizon of the desired interconnected maritime drone combat. This new level of multi-domain drone networking was described at the Navy League’s Sea Air Space Symposium by Capt. Pete Small, Program Manager for Unmanned Systems. Small said this is now being advanced through a collaborative effort between Naval Sea Systems Command and Naval Air Systems Command.


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Radical Flying-V Jet Would Seat Passengers in the Wings

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 05:01

Dutch airline KLM is funding the development of this new, wing-swept commercial jet inspired by the shape of a famous guitar.


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Fallen Money Manager Turns to YouTube to Explain Losses and Stranded Cash

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 05:00

“I am extremely sorry that we’ve had to take this decision,” Woodford, wearing a dark pullover, said in a video posted to YouTube overnight in London. “We understand our investors’ frustration. Former bond king Bill Gross, who enjoyed decades of success, issued a letter to investors in 2011 titled “Mea Culpa” after his fund lagged peers.


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Hungarian government submits bill to tighten grip over scientists

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 04:27

Hungary's government is moving to tighten its grip on the research institutions of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, despite protests by scientists against political control of the academy. Since taking power in 2010, Prime Minister Viktor Orban has tightened government control of public life, including the courts, the media and universities.


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NASA's first SpaceX astronauts ready for 'messy camping trip' to space

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 04:07

The first U.S. astronauts chosen to fly aboard a SpaceX capsule built for NASA shrugged off a spate of design and test mishaps, saying such setbacks were "part of the process" and the new technology was far more advanced than the space shuttle program that ended eight years ago. Space shuttle veterans Bob Behnken, 48, and Doug Hurley, 52 are slated for blastoff later this year from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in the debut manned flight of the Crew Dragon capsule to the International Space Station and back. Two fellow astronauts, Mike Hopkins, 50, and Victor Glover, 43, are designated for launch aboard the vehicle's first official operational mission at a later date, possibly with two more crew members from other countries.


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NASA's first SpaceX astronauts ready for 'messy camping trip' to space

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 04:05

The first U.S. astronauts chosen to fly aboard a SpaceX capsule built for NASA shrugged off a spate of design and test mishaps, saying such setbacks were "part of the process" and the new technology was far more advanced than the space shuttle program that ended eight years ago. Space shuttle veterans Bob Behnken, 48, and Doug Hurley, 52 are slated for blastoff later this year from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in the debut manned flight of the Crew Dragon capsule to the International Space Station and back. Two fellow astronauts, Mike Hopkins, 50, and Victor Glover, 43, are designated for launch aboard the vehicle's first official operational mission at a later date, possibly with two more crew members from other countries.


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US scientists develop relaxation mobile app to help manage migraines

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 04:04

Developed by scientists at New York University School of Medicine, the app -- called RELAXaHead -- guides patients through a relaxation technique called progressive muscle relaxation, or PMR. Published in the journal Nature Digital Medicine, the study is billed as the first to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a mobile app in treating migraines.


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Seabirds feast when penguins herd fish to surface

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 03:56

When pint-sized African penguins dive in the icy waters off South Africa's Stony Point, there's a good chance that hungry cormorants and shearwaters are hovering overhead. The birds remain in a holding pattern in the air because the penguins, when they reappear, are likely to have herded a school of anchovies to within striking range. The penguins, of course, are not acting out of altruism.


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Donald Trump softens stance on climate change in response to Prince Charles' passion for the environment

Wed, 06/05/2019 - 03:47

Donald Trump appears to have softened his stance on climate change having been "moved" by Prince Charles' passion for the environment.  In a 30-minute long interview, aired on Wednesday morning, Mr Trump - who has previously accused climate experts of having a "political agenda" - told ITV's Good Morning Britain he "totally listened" to Charles when the issue came up. He said of the meeting at Clarence House on Monday: "We had a 15 minute chat and it lasted an hour and a half and he did most of the talking. "What he really wants and what he feels strongly about is the future. He wants the best climate for the future. He wants a good climate and not a disaster."  The US president has always been a sceptic, but when asked whether he now believes in climate change, Mr Trump said:  "I believe there is a change in weather. I think it was called global warning, then it was called climate change, now it's called extreme weather.  Prince Charles and President Trump with the Duchess of Cornwall and First Lady Melania Trump Credit: REUTERS "I think we had a great conversation about - as you would call it - climate change.  "This is real, he believes that. He wants to have a world that's good for future generations and I do, too. "He's Prince Charles, he doesn't have to worry about future generations unless he's a very good person who cares about people, and that's what impressed me, maybe the most." Mr Trump also mentioned China, India and Russia, urging them to take more responsibility for their pollution. Donald Trump's UK state visit, in pictures Before his state visit, hundreds of climate change experts urged Prime Minister Theresa May to confront Donald Trump over his approach to the issue. A letter signed by 250 academics from universities and research bodies across the UK stated that his refusal to tackle global warming is "increasing risks for lives and livelihoods" around the world.


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