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Greta Thunberg sets off for the US on carbon neutral yacht, but says she doesn't expect to win over Donald Trump

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 09:00

Greta Thunberg has said she doesn't expect to win over Donald Trump to her climate change campaign as she embarked on a two week carbon neutral journey across the Atlantic from Plymouth to New York. Before setting off, the 16-year-old Swede said she would simply “ignore” climate sceptics and that “there are always going to be people who don't understand or accept the united science.” At a blustery marina in Plymouth, Thunberg said that she was excited about her two week voyage on board the 60ft racing yacht Malizia II, and that despite feeling seasick on a test sail, she is “excited to see what happens.” There is no fridge, no heating and no washing facility on the boat. For ablutions, there is a blue bucket marked ‘poos here please’. But the 16-year-old Swede couldn’t be happier. Ms Thunberg waved from the yacht as she set off from Plymouth on Wednesday afternoon Credit: Ben Stansall/AFP Travelling with her father Svante, two experienced skippers and a documentary maker, Thunberg says she has only packed a box of freeze-dried vegan meals, eight writing journals, some books and no change of clothes. Thunberg is travelling to New York, where she will speak at the UN climate summit on September 23 and then spend a number of months travelling around the Americas, raising awareness of the climate crisis. Today, she told The Telegraph that she didn’t believe that President Trump would listen to her.  Thunberg's supporter's gathered at Devil's Point, Plymouth this afternoon Credit: Ben Birchall/PA “If no-one else has succeeded, I’m not that special. I can’t convince everyone, so instead of speaking to me and to the school striking children and teenagers, he should be talking to actual scientists and experts in this area,” she said. On climate sceptics, she added: "There's always going to be people who don't understand or accept the united science, and I will just ignore them, as I'm only acting and communicating on the science." Thunberg clutched a metal re-usable water bottle as she boarded the Malizia II this afternoon. The boat is captained by Boris Hermann, a 38-year-old German who has sailed it around the world. It reportedly cost more than £4m to build and has solar panels and underwater turbines to generate the electricity needed to power the instruments on board.  There is an emergency combustion engine, in accordance with maritime safety measures, but there are no plans to use it. The global phenomenon | Greta Thunberg Thunberg is being joined on the voyage by her father, Svante, Pierre Casiraghi, head of the Malizia II racing team and the grandson of Monaco's late Prince Ranier III and actress Grace Kelly, as well as Swedish documentary filmmaker Nathan Grossman. The boat left Plymouth just after 3pm to crowds of wellwishers on the marina pontoons and along the shoreline. Thunberg, still only 16 years old, began protesting outside the Swedish parliament just a year ago, demanding immediate action to combat climate change after the most severe wildfires in the country’s history. Her movement, dubbed: “school strike for the climate” captured public attention, and by March this year, some 1.4m students at schools in 112 countries across the world were walking out of lessons on Fridays in order to raise awareness of the climate crisis. Greta Thunberg and German yachtsman Boris Herrmann in a press conference for her trip to New York Credit: ANDY RAIN/EPA-EFE/REX The trailblazing teen has spent the summer crossing Europe by train in a bid to spread her message, telling world leaders in Davos: “I want you to act like the house is on fire. Because it is.” She received a round of applause from British MPs when visiting parliament in April and has had audiences with Pope Francis and United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres. While the transatlantic crossing will be a test of endurance, Thunberg has faced many personal challenges already in her short life. Diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, obsessive–compulsive disorder, and selective mutism, the teenager suffered from depression earlier in her childhood. “I’ve had my fair share of depressions, alienation, anxiety and disorders,” she wrote on Facebook recently.  “But without my diagnosis, I would never have started school striking. Because then I would have been like everyone else.” Now, after being listed as one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people of 2019, she has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize and would become its youngest ever winner, if she is chosen in October.


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A London college has banned beef from campus to fight climate change

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 08:35

Banning beef is one of several changes that Goldsmiths, University of London is making in an attempt to become carbon neutral by 2025.


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Novartis replaces top scientists at Avexis after drug data manipulated

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 08:34

Novartis AG said on Wednesday it replaced the two top research and development executives at its Avexis unit after some data was manipulated from early testing of a gene therapy for infants that costs more than $2 million. Avexis' Chief Scientific Officer Brian Kaspar and Senior Vice President of Research and Development Allan Kaspar have not been involved in any operations at Avexis since early May 2019, Novartis said in a statement. Brian Kaspar was a founder and key executive at Avexis and made more than $380 million from the company's 2018 acquisition by Novartis, according to SEC filings.


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Novartis replaces top scientists at Avexis after drug data manipulated

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 08:34

Novartis AG said on Wednesday it replaced the two top research and development executives at its Avexis unit after some data was manipulated from early testing of a gene therapy for infants that costs more than $2 million. Avexis' Chief Scientific Officer Brian Kaspar and Senior Vice President of Research and Development Allan Kaspar have not been involved in any operations at Avexis since early May 2019, Novartis said in a statement. Brian Kaspar was a founder and key executive at Avexis and made more than $380 million from the company's 2018 acquisition by Novartis, according to SEC filings.


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Teenage activist Greta takes climate campaign to the high seas

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 08:33

With the wind in her hair and TV cameras pointing at her, Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg began a trans-Atlantic crossing in a racing yacht on Wednesday to further her campaign for stronger action against climate change. The 16-year-old activist, who shot to global fame last year after she started missing school every Friday to demonstrate outside the Swedish parliament, is bound for New York, where she will take part in a United Nations climate summit. Standing on a pontoon in a marina in Plymouth, southwest England, Thunberg gave a news conference in front of a throng of TV crews and photographers just before setting sail under a typically English grey sky on the 60-foot yacht Malizia II.


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Deciphera's GIST Drug Succeeds in Pivotal Study, Stock Up 80%

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 07:37

Deciphera's (DCPH) pipeline candidate, ripretinib, improves progression free survival in a pivotal study evaluating it in previously treated, advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors.


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Lilly's Taltz Outshines J&J's Tremfya in Psoriasis Study

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 07:24

Lilly's (LLY) Taltz is an important revenue driver for Lilly. Top-line data from a study shows that Taltz helps more plaque psoriasis patients achieve 100% skin clearance compared to Tremfya.


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Library of spider silk could hold secrets for new materials

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 07:13

With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope. In just a few minutes she found what she was seeking: hundreds of silk glands, the organs spiders use to make their webs. Each lets the spider produce a different type of silk.


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Kadmon (KDMN) Completes Enrollment in KD025 Study for cGVHD

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 07:10

Kadmon Holdings (KDMN) completes enrollment in the study of its pipeline candidate, KD025, for the treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD).


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Greta Thunberg Explains Why She Won't 'Waste Time' Talking To Trump

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 06:20

The 16-year-old Swedish climate change activist sets sail for the U.S. on board a zero-emissions yacht on Wednesday.


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Scientists say monster penguin once swam New Zealand oceans

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 05:52

Scientists in New Zealand said Wednesday they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of an adult human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. It's believed to have been one of several species of giant penguins that thrived soon after dinosaurs died out. Paul Scofield, a co-author of the paper and senior curator at the Canterbury Museum, said the discovery is significant because the species is similar to another giant penguin found in Antarctica in 2000 and helps show a connection between the two regions during the Paleocene Epoch.


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From not having kids to battling anxiety: Climate change is shaping life choices and affecting mental health

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 05:00

For some, ignoring climate change is not an option. It’s real, and preventing global warming from getting worse is a driving force in their lives.


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The Full Sturgeon Moon Rises This Week — Here's How to See It

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 04:31

On Aug. 15, a dramatic full moon will be best seen in the west before dawn and in the east at sunset.


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Study: A bulkhead doesn’t mean property along North Carolina’s estuaries is safe

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 03:30

After Matthew, researchers found homes with bulkheads tended to be closer to water and see more damage than those with natural shorelines.


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Pompeii’s Latest Find? Tiny Penises and Seduction Charms

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 02:45

Archaeological Park of PompeiiROME–Archaeologists at the ongoing dig in the ancient city of Pompeii, buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D., couldn’t believe their eyes when they found the remains of a wooden box filled with tiny penises carved from stone, buttons made of bones, marble closed fists and even a miniature sculpted skull that are thought to be part of a sorcerer’s treasure trove. Pompeii’s chief archaeologist Massimo Osanna said the amazing artifacts were most certainly used in rituals tied to seduction, sex, fertility, and even warding off death. Archaeological Park of Pompeii“There are dozens of good luck charms next to other objects that were attributed to the power of crushing bad luck,” he said, describing the scarabs, or beetle-shaped amulets, that would have been brought from the Middle East that were used to ensure resurrection and immortality in the ancient world. The Pompeii Man Would’ve Been a Lonely MasturbatorThe box also contained a minuscule likeness of Harpocrates, the god of silence and secrets, and two small mirrors, pieces of jewelry, and a glass carving of Dionysus, the Roman god of wine, fertility, ritual madness and religious ecstasy. The sheer range of symbolism represented could have meant that the owner of the objects was likely a female sorceress who performed a number of different rituals. This was something akin to her tool kit. Osanna believes that the woman who likely owned them was a slave because none of the objects were made of gold, and perhaps only used in rituals among lower ranking Pompeiians. He also said that they were not likely worn as ornamental jewelry but instead worn or carried only during underworld activities. Archaeological Park of Pompeii“They are objects of everyday life in the female world and are extraordinary because they tell micro-stories, biographies of the inhabitants of the city who tried to escape the eruption,” Osanna said in a statement published on the Pompeii archaeological website. “In the same house, we discovered a room with 10 victims, including women and children.” They are now using DNA to determine whether the victims were related or had simply gathered there as Vesuvius rumbled above. The incredible find was discovered in the House of the Garden in a newly excavated section of the ancient archaeological site that is thought to have belonged to a man of considerable status based on the quality of some of the other artifacts and paintings found in the dwelling. An inscription in this particular house found last year also hinted that perhaps Vesuvius erupted in October, 79 A.D., not December, as historians have been led to believe. Archaeological Park of PompeiiExcavation work has been ongoing at the site since the late 16th century, stopping and starting with invasions, wars, natural disasters and budget crises. Most recently, the site planners have come under heavy criticism for excavating too much of the area, which is covered by a thick layer of volcanic ash that has effectively preserved so much of the ancient site. In 2012, Italy’s culture ministry launched the Great Pompeii Project, injecting around $120 million to ramp up excavation work with little focus on preservation of what has already been uncovered.Archaeological Park of PompeiiSome experts say that leaving the ash in place is the only way to save the site from man-made disasters, including neglect. “They seem not to realize that the enthusiasm for archaeology is committing an act of vandalism to volcanology,” Roberto Scandone, a professor of volcanology at the Roma Tre University told the Guardian recently. “Leaving some of the deposits in place is valuable not only for scientists but also for visitors, who will be able to see at first hand how the volcano destroyed the town.”Osanna told The Daily Beast that the fascinating trinkets are now being studied to better understand just how they were used. They will be put on display later this year in an exhibition on the site.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


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China government think tank presses for 2025 CO2 cap

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 01:29

An influential Chinese think tank is calling on the government to set absolute caps on climate-warming greenhouse gas to ensure the country is on course for emissions to peak by the end of the next decade. China, the world's biggest producer of greenhouse gas, has pledged to bring its total emissions to a peak by "around 2030" as part of its commitments to a global 2015 accord aimed at curbing temperature rises. On a "business as usual" trajectory, annual CO2 emissions would grow from 11 gigatonnes in 2020 to 14.3 gigatonnes in 2030, and would still be rising, it said.


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China government think tank presses for 2025 CO2 cap

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 01:01

An influential Chinese think tank is calling on the government to set absolute caps on climate-warming greenhouse gas to ensure the country is on course for emissions to peak by the end of the next decade. China, the world's biggest producer of greenhouse gas, has pledged to bring its total emissions to a peak by "around 2030" as part of its commitments to a global 2015 accord aimed at curbing temperature rises. On a "business as usual" trajectory, annual CO2 emissions would grow from 11 gigatonnes in 2020 to 14.3 gigatonnes in 2030, and would still be rising, it said.


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Songbirds silenced as Colombia fights wildlife trafficking

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 22:00

"That's what it feels like to be free," said Juan Camilo Panqueba, a veterinarian at a quarantine center in Colombia's high Andean capital, far from the canary's natural habitat along the humid, Caribbean coast. Prosecutors are also more aggressively going after the criminal networks that thrive on the illegal trade, whose profits trail only drug and arms smuggling, according to police.


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Italy marks bridge disaster in shadow of political crisis

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 21:40

Italy on Wednesday marks a year since the Genoa motorway bridge collapse that killed 43 people, as the country grapples with a political crisis sparked by far-right leader Matteo Salvini. "I invite all Genoa citizens to take part in the ceremony to remember the victims of the Morandi bridge.


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NASA descends on Icelandic lava field to prepare for Mars

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 21:40

To prepare for the next mission to Mars in 2020, NASA has taken to the lava fields of Iceland to get its new robotic space explorer ready for the job. With its black basalt sand, wind-swept dunes and craggy peaks, the Lambahraun lava field at the foot of Iceland's second biggest glacier, Langjokull, was chosen as a stand-in for the Red Planet's surface. It will aim to continue the work of the "Curiosity" rover, which has been exploring Mars since 2012 in search of signs of ancient life and making preparations for human exploration.


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