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Apollo astronauts celebrate 50 years since first moon landing

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:59

Three astronauts instrumental in the groundbreaking U.S. space program of the 1960s and 70s gathered at the Paris Air Show on Tuesday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, the mission that first put a man on the moon. Walter Cunningham, 87, who was part of the Apollo 7 mission, Al Worden, 87, who flew with Apollo 15, and Charlie Duke, 83, who walked on the moon with Apollo 16, recounted their extra-terrestrial experiences before a captive airshow audience. Worden, who orbited the moon alone for days in 1971, holds the feat of having been the world's most isolated human, while Cunningham is notable for being part of a team that talked back to Mission Control in 1968, getting them blacklisted from future flights.


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It's 'Lazy Medicine' When Doctors Blame Everything on Your Weight

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:52

Elizabeth Pidgeon describes what she calls, "lazy medicine," as doctors continue to blame most of her health conditions on her weight.


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Indian family branches out with novel tree house

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:50

When the Kesharwanis decided to branch out and expand their family home, they came up with a novel way of dealing with an ancient giant fig tree in their garden -- they built the house around it. "We are nature lovers and my father insisted that we keep the tree," said Yogesh Kesharwani, whose parent built the house in 1994 with the help of an engineer friend. The fig tree, known as peepal in Hindi, is considered sacred by many in India and cutting one down is considered inauspicious.


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Apollo astronauts celebrate 50 years since first moon landing

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:47

Three astronauts instrumental in the groundbreaking U.S. space programme of the 1960s and 70s gathered at the Paris Air Show on Tuesday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, the mission that first put a man on the moon. Walter Cunningham, 87, who was part of the Apollo 7 mission, Al Worden, 87, who flew with Apollo 15, and Charlie Duke, 83, who walked on the moon with Apollo 16, recounted their extra-terrestrial experiences before a captive airshow audience. Worden, who orbited the moon alone for days in 1971, holds the feat of having been the world's most isolated human, while Cunningham is notable for being part of a team that talked back to Mission Control in 1968, getting them blacklisted from future flights.


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Eight EU countries to phase out coal by 2030

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:26

Eight of the EU's 28 countries have pledged to phase out coal for electricity production by 2030 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, officials said Tuesday. The European Commission, the EU's executive arm, received the pledges as contributions to the bloc's efforts to deliver on the 2015 Paris climate agreement. "More and more member states are making the political commitment to phase out coal in the next decade," EU climate and energy commissioner Miguel Arias Canete said.


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Pick the Best Fruit for Your Health

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:55

With everything fruit has going for it—natural sweetness, beautiful colors, tons of nutrients—you’d think people would be eating loads of it. But only 12 percent of Americans get the 1½ to 2 cups...


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Pick the Best Fruit for Your Health

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:55

With everything fruit has going for it—natural sweetness, beautiful colors, tons of nutrients—you’d think people would be eating loads of it. But only 12 percent of Americans get the 1½ to 2 cups...


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Heat Stroke Vs. Heat Exhaustion—A Doctor Explains the Difference

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:50

What does a heat stroke feel like? Here are the warning signs of a heat stroke and heat exhaustion.


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What Happens When Scientists Experiment on Themselves?

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:44

Cross a compulsive need to discover the truth with a strong sense of adventure, and watch modern medicine move forward.


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Doctors Share What the Future of Skin Cancer Treatment Looks Like

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:20

This article first appeared in the Summer 2019 issue of NewBeauty. Click here to subscribe.From 3-D printing to matrix magic, the treatment for skin cancer keeps improving. And, while New York plastic surgeon Stafford Broumand, MD is wary of calling attention to anything “new” regarding skin cancer treatment, he has seen a recent shift in the field, in one particularly crucial area. “The ‘new’ isn’t so important—what’s important is that more people are getting checked and then getting the skin cancer removed.” Invisible ...


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The Next Frontier for Skin Cancer

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:20

This article first appeared in the Summer 2019 issue of NewBeauty. Click here to subscribe.Brittany Arthur tries not to be “the crazy person who scolds people about their sunscreen use.” But the 35-year-old can’t help it. “I was 27 when I was diagnosed with melanoma. I was always the one in the sun and the tanning bed—all throughout high school, extra visits before the prom, all during the summer, and then all throughout college. Even the apartments I lived in had free ...


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Chipmakers Surge as Trade Optimism Offsets Analyst Caution

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:16

(Bloomberg) -- Shares of semiconductor companies rallied on Tuesday as optimism that trade tensions between the U.S. and China could be easing pushed investors to look past a growing consensus that an industry rebound is unlikely to occur in the second half of the year.The Philadelphia semiconductor index advanced as much as 5%, compared with a 1.4% increase in the S&P 500 Index. Among notable gainers, Nvidia Corp. rose 6.8% while Micron Technology Inc. jumped 6.8% and Western Digital Corp. added 6.4%. Texas Instruments Inc. gained 4.2% while Intel Corp. rose 4%.The advance came after President Donald Trump said he had a “very good” phone conversation with Chinese President Xi Jinping and that he would hold an “extended meeting” with him at the G-20 meeting. Trump had previously threatened to raise tariffs if Xi didn’t sit with him at next week’s meeting in Japan.Chipmakers have been highly correlated to the trade issue, as the companies derive a hefty percentage of their revenue from China. The country is also a key part of their supply chains. Recently, semiconductor volatility rose after the Trump administration blacklisted Huawei, a major consumer to a number of semiconductor companies. Last week, Broadcom Inc. cut its full-year sales forecast because of trade risks and its Huawei exposure.“Huawei casts a large shadow,” Stifel analysts wrote on Tuesday. “There is no getting around its significance.” Analyst Brian Chin lowered his estimates for a number of semiconductor companies for the second half of the year, saying that the industry’s “malaise” in May was “now too acute to ignore.”That view was echoed by analysts at KeyBanc Capital Markets in a report dated June 17. The firm wrote that “the recent U.S./China trade war escalation, including the Huawei ban, has dashed hopes for a 2H recovery for broad-based semiconductors.” Analyst Weston Twigg added that a trip to Asia “left us more cautious” on the industry, and that there was an “increased risk to forward estimates” as the trade dispute “has led to a meaningful decline in bookings.”Deutsche Bank analysts recently returned from an Asia trip of their own, emerging “more cautious on the semiconductor and semicap sectors” as a result, “especially given that the often promised H2 rebound is looking increasingly optimistic.”Analyst Rob Sanders wrote that trade tensions were “significantly elevating uncertainty surrounding near- and mid-term business conditions,” and that “in most instances, this uncertainty is acting as a headwind to demand.”The escalation in trade-related tensions came at a time when the industry has already been struggling with weak demand and high inventory levels. According to the Semiconductor Industry Association, total semiconductor sales sank 17.7% in April, its most recent month of data.To contact the reporter on this story: Ryan Vlastelica in New York at rvlastelica1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.net, Jennifer Bissell-Linsk, Richard RichtmyerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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Visa, Mastercard, PayPal Join Facebook to Form Crypto Effort

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:13

(Bloomberg) -- If Facebook Inc.’s new digital currency goes according to plan, it could one day compete with payment giants Visa Inc., Mastercard Inc. and PayPal Holdings Inc. But for now, all three are set to work with the social-media company on the venture.The currency, called Libra, will launch as soon as next year. It’s what’s known as a stablecoin, one that can avoid massive fluctuations in value so it can be used for everyday transactions. Industry experts and insiders say the payments companies want a seat at the table to help shape the new currency.Read Facebook’s Project Libra white paper here“It’s not unusual for the incumbents -- Visa, Mastercard, PayPal -- to partner with a disruptor,” Harshita Rawat, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein, said in an interview. “They would at least want to participate in how this product is being developed.”New payment methods such as Apple Pay and other mobile wallets are often slow to take off, so any competition is likely to be years away. Still, the earlier payments companies come to the project, the more time they have to ensure their businesses don’t suffer.None of these companies has been shy about pursuing collaboration or other strategic opportunities. PayPal alone has spent billions of dollars buying or investing in potential partnerships as well as competitors. While PayPal hasn’t ventured into cryptocurrencies before, it was a proponent of the blockchain technology that will be used to build Libra.Visa and Mastercard are always looking to embed themselves in emerging payment forms. Both have developed partnerships with cryptocurrency and blockchain firms. They’ve said that Libra can help more people gain access to financial products.“We think cryptocurrencies can address use cases that are not really well served today,” such as areas where cash-based payments remain prominent, said Jorn Lambert, executive vice president of digital solutions at Mastercard. “As such we think it will be incremental to what we do and not a replacement of it.”The payment companies are part of the Libra Association, giving them a say in how the cryptocurrency is managed. There’s currently no time commitment, so members can leave at any time. Once the group’s charter is finalized, there will be a minimum time commitment, according to some members of the group who asked not to be identified discussing private matters.“My sense is that they will try their best to partner and engage with Facebook,” Rawat said. “If Facebook takes the angle that they want to disintermediate card payments, then I think they may not want to participate.”Facebook shares rose 1.4% to $191.61 as of 11:12 a.m. in New York after announcing the cryptocurrency venture.(Updates with shares in final paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Julie Verhage in New York at jverhage2@bloomberg.net;Jenny Surane in New York at jsurane4@bloomberg.net;Kurt Wagner in San Francisco at kwagner71@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Mark Milian at mmilian@bloomberg.net, Dan Reichl, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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US preschoolers less pudgy in latest sign of falling obesity

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:04

Preschoolers on government food aid have grown a little less pudgy, a U.S. study found, offering fresh evidence that previous signs of declining obesity rates weren't a fluke. Obesity rates dropped steadily to about 14% in 2016 — the latest data available — from 16% in 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported. "It gives us more hope that this is a real change," said Heidi Blanck, who heads obesity prevention at the CDC.


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Scientists just filmed a deep sea creature spew a glowing substance

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:01

At some 4,700 feet beneath the sea, marine scientists filmed a shrimp spew glowing matter, or bioluminescence, from its mouth.  This natural event, which might seem fictional, happened as researchers looked for the elusive giant squid in the Gulf of Mexico. They have yet to spot the massive cephalopods — first caught on film in 2012 — but recorded, for likely the first time ever, a deep sea shrimp belching a radiant substance into its lightless world. The collaborative exploration mission, called "Journey into Midnight," seeks to sleuth out both the giant squid and other little-seen animal life in the ocean's sprawling pelagic zone — the great realm between the surface and the sea floor.  "It's one of the least studied habitats on the planet," explained marine biologist Nathan Robinson, director of the Cape Eleuthera Institute in the Bahamas. The trick to studying life of deep-sea animals is to observe unobtrusively, which is what @TeamORCA's Medusa deep-sea camera does. During Journey into Midnight expedition, Medusa recorded this first-known in situ video of shrimp spewing bioluminescence: https://t.co/6xsV12bgoW pic.twitter.com/eOOZavtWCG — NOAA Ocean Explorer (@oceanexplorer) June 17, 2019 Robinson and his team captured footage of the shrimp, seen darting through the frame before belching a puff of bioluminescence, using a flashing lure to attract the animal to the camera.  But the shrimp quickly discovered there was nothing to eat, and reacted defensively after colliding with the lure's case, or housing.  "It actually bumps into the housing and gets startled," said Robinson, from the research vessel R/V Point Sur in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico. "The spew is used as a defensive mechanism."  In the dark oceans, sea creatures will naturally create their own radiant light, or bioluminescence, to fend off predators. The puff of light could be a distraction, allowing the shrimp time to escape, explained Robinson. Or, it could be a "burglar alarm," alerting even bigger predators to come near, and then startling the initial predator away. In the case of the shrimp, marine ecologists know that these critters have specialized glands in their mouth that excrete glow-inducing enzymes (a substance that sparks a chemical reaction). Ultimately, though the chemical mechanism is still under investigation, these enzymes facilitate a reaction that creates light.  Though Robinson has observed deep sea shrimp secrete the glowing stuff after they've been brought to the surface, "this is the first time that we've been able to see the shrimp spew in its natural habitat." SEE ALSO: Who is this see-through alien? To spy more unprecedented behavior — and perhaps the elusive giant squids — the research team uses a deep sea camera called Medusa, developed with the help of bioluminescence expert Edie Widder, who is also aboard the expedition. The camera only emits a faint red light — light that's invisible to sea life — so they aren't scared off by the radiant intrusion.  For "bait," Widder employs a ring of LED lights, designed to mimic a bioluminescent jellyfish. "The shrimp sees the lure and it comes in to investigate," explained Robinson.  Widder, who captured the first-ever footage of the giant squids (which she said can grow some 40-feet in length) is also eager to understand why the deep sea glows as night, as radiant, decomposing particles of "marine snow" drift through the black water.  Deploying the Medusa instrument into the water. Image: NOAA / Journey into Midnight "I believe a significant portion of the marine snow is bioluminescent," Widder told Mashable last year. "I certainly want to know the answer before I die." "It's my Moby Dick," she added. But right now, the mission at hand is giant squids. And whatever else might visit her deep sea camera — like spewing shrimp. "We're really starting to get a glimpse of these unique behaviors that we've never seen before in their natural habitat," said Robinson, before getting off the phone to search for giant squids.  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


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New study finds poor oral health may increase the risk of liver cancer by 75 percent

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 08:59

A new large-scale UK study has found that poor oral health may be linked to an increased risk of liver cancer, building on previous research which has also linked oral health to a range of diseases. Carried out by researchers at Queen's University Belfast, the new study looked at data on 475,766 people taken from UK Biobank -- a large long-term study which includes genomic data on more than half a million UK residents as well as data on brain imaging, their general health and medical information.


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Scientists amazed as Canadian permafrost thaws 70 years early

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 08:51

Permafrost at outposts in the Canadian Arctic is thawing 70 years earlier than predicted, an expedition has discovered, in the latest sign that the global climate crisis is accelerating even faster than scientists had feared. A team from the University of Alaska Fairbanks said they were astounded by how quickly a succession of unusually hot summers had destabilized the upper layers of giant subterranean ice blocks that had been frozen solid for millennia. "What we saw was amazing," Vladimir E. Romanovsky, a professor of geophysics at the university, told Reuters by telephone.


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We’ll Never Solve Immigration If We Don’t Solve Climate Change

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Tue, 06/18/2019 - 08:42

We’ll Never Solve Immigration If We Don’t Solve Climate Change


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