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Indian Government Minister Resigns Amid Allegations of Sexual Misconduct

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 19:33

M.J. Akbar, India's junior external affairs minister, resigned Wednesday amid accusations by 20 women of sexual harassment


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West Coast quake warning system now operational, with limits

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 18:08

Automated alerts from the fledgling West Coast earthquake early warning system are ready to be used broadly by businesses, utilities, schools and other entities but not for mass public notification, officials said Wednesday. "We're making a large change from a production prototype in pilot mode to an open-for-business operational mode," Doug Given, earthquake early warning coordinator for the U.S. Geological Survey, told a press conference at the California Institute of Technology. The system being built for California, Oregon and Washington detects that an earthquake is occurring, quickly analyzes the data and sends out alerts that may give warnings of several seconds to a minute before strong shaking arrives at locations away from the epicenter.


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Scientists in Chile unveil 'A Cosmic Titan' cluster of galaxies

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 18:05

Hyperion has a mass 1 million billion times greater than the sun and is so distant that it is viewed from earth as it looked billions of years ago. "Hyperion is like 5,000 galaxies of the Milky Way", astronomer Steffen Miefke, the chief of operations for the European Southern Observatory, told Reuters. The ESO operates the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, which detected Hyperion.


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How keeping the windows clean and curtains open could stop you getting ill

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 18:00

It is a simple strategy for staying healthy, but a new study has found that allowing sunlight to stream in through windows could kill bacteria that live in dust. Researchers at the University of Oregon found that in dark rooms 12 per cent of bacteria on average were alive and able to reproduce. In comparison only 6.8 per cent of bacteria exposed to daylight and 6.1 per cent of bacteria exposed to UV light were able to replicate. Lead author Dr Ashkaan Fahimipour said: “Humans spend most of their time indoors, where exposure to dust particles that carry a variety of bacteria, including pathogens that can make us sick, is unavoidable. “Therefore, it is important to understand how features of the buildings we occupy influence dust ecosystems and how this could affect our health.” The researchers made eleven identical climate-controlled miniature rooms that mimicked real buildings and seeded them with dust collected in residential homes. Sunlight may stop bacteria being able to replicate Credit: HO Reuters  The authors applied one of three glazing treatments to the windows of the rooms, so that they transmitted visible, ultraviolet or no light. After 90 days, the authors collected dust from each environment and analysed the composition, abundance, and viability of the bacteria present. Dust kept in the dark contained organisms closely related to species associated with respiratory diseases, which were largely absent in dust exposed to daylight. The authors also found that a smaller proportion of human skin-derived bacteria and a larger proportion of outdoor air-derived bacteria lived in dust exposed to light that in than in dust not exposed to light. They believe it may suggest that daylight causes the microbiome of indoor dust to more strongly resemble bacterial communities found outdoors. Dr Fahimipour said: “Our study supports a century-old folk wisdom, that daylight has the potential to kill microbes on dust particles, but we need more research to understand the underlying causes of shifts in the dust microbiome following light exposure. “We hope that with further understanding, we could design access to daylight in buildings such as schools, offices, hospitals and homes in ways that reduce the risk of dust-borne infections.” The researchers warn that homes and offices may contain architectural and geographical features that produce lower or higher dosages of light which would produce different results.  


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Retired Marine, Who Fought in Vietnam, Receives the Medal of Honor

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 17:29

President Donald Trump presented the nation’s highest military honor Wednesday to an 80-year-old retired Marine sergeant major who five decades ago “fought with unmatched bravery” at the beginning of one of the Vietnam War’s battles.


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'Bad news': CO2 emissions to rise in 2018, says IEA chief

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 17:12

Energy sector carbon emissions will rise in 2018 after hitting record levels the year before, dimming prospects for meeting Paris climate treaty goals, the head of the International Energy Agency (IEA) said Wednesday. The energy sector accounts for 80 percent of global CO2 emissions, with most of the rest caused by deforestation and agriculture, so its performance is key to efforts to rein in rising world temperatures. "I'm sorry, I have very bad news for you," IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol told guests at a diplomatic function hosted by the Polish embassy in Paris.


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Scientists spot six near-extinct vaquita porpoises

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 16:21

The near-extinct vaquita marina, the world's smallest porpoise, has not yet disappeared from its habitat off the coast of Mexico, a research team said Wednesday after spotting six of them. The vaquita has been nearly wiped out by illegal fishing in its native habitat, the Gulf of California, and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) warned in May that it could go extinct this year. The team emphasized that the study was not a full population estimate, which they will present in January after further research.


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Why the Release of Pastor Andrew Brunson Is a Good Sign for U.S-Turkey Ties

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 16:04

Here's how Erdogan and Trump can move forward on key issues


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Rocket Lab picks Virginia’s Wallops Island for U.S. launch site, adding to N.Z. pad

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 14:44

Rocket Lab officially unveiled its plan to build a commercial launch site at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport on Virginia’s Wallops Island, with liftoffs due to begin in a year. The facility, which will be called Launch Complex 2, provides a U.S.-based alternative to Rocket Lab’s first launch pad on New Zealand’s Mahia Peninsula. So far, Rocket Lab’s Electron launch vehicle has flown just two test missions, including a successful rise to orbit in January. The third liftoff, nicknamed “It’s Business Time” in homage to the New Zealand comedy duo known as Flight of the Conchords, is set to launch from… Read More


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Driver Fatally Shoots North Carolina State Trooper During a Traffic Stop

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 13:34

A North Carolina state trooper was shot and killed after pulling over a pickup truck on suspicion of speeding.


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A Lawsuit by Asian-American Students Against Harvard Could End Affirmative Action as We Know It

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 13:13

A Lawsuit by Asian-American Students Against Harvard Could End Affirmative Action as We Know It


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Family Border Crossings Spiked in September: Report

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 12:48

The Washington Post reports that arrests of family units were up in September, though official numbers have not been released


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China to launch artificial 'moon' into orbit to light up city 

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 12:17

China is to launch a fake "moon" into space that it hopes will illuminate one of the country's biggest cities. Officials in Chengdu, a city of 14 million people in China's southwestern province of Sichuan, announced plans to place a satellite in orbit by 2020 capable of reflecting sunlight onto its streets at night, claiming it will be bright enough to entirely replace street lights.   The satellite would use a reflective coating to direct light to illuminate an area on earth of up to 50 square miles, according to Wu Chunfeng, chairman of the city’s Aerospace Science and Technology Microelectronics System Research Institute.  The launch follows a similar project in 1999 when Russian researchers planned to use orbiting mirrors to light up cities in Siberia, hoping it would be a cheaper alternative to electric lighting.  The scheme developed by Russia used a device called Znamya 2. It was equipped with a 25-metre mirror to illuminate a three-mile wide patch of land. During its first orbit the craft was destroyed following a collision in space. The scheme was abandoned.   Technology intelligence - newsletter promo - EOA In remarks first reported by CIFNews, Mr Chunfeng told a science event in Chengdu that the artificial moon, which has been undergoing testing for several years, will produce at least eight times more light than the real moon. He did not say how much the project would cost.  Scientists have warned the device could disturb wildlife and disrupt systems that observe the earth’s atmosphere. However, Kang Weimin, a director at the School of Aerospace at the Harbin Institute of Technology, told CIFNews that the satellite will produce a dusk-like glow, meaning it will not affect animals.


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Glitzy 'Science Oscars' to make stars of researchers

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 12:11

Nine scientists were recognized Wednesday with a "Breakthrough Prize," a $3 million Silicon Valley-funded award meant to confer Oscars-style glamour and prestige on the basic sciences. The prizes in physics, life sciences and mathematics went to six men and three women, including four researchers who shared two prizes and five who get the full reward to themselves. Five US-based researchers who won prizes in the life sciences included Frank Bennett and Adrian Krainer, from companies in Carlsbad, California and Long Island, New York.


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Want to test your DNA? Amazon has AncestryDNA kits on sale for $30 off.

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 12:07

Besides the flaming mess that is the current political climate, DNA testing is a huge thing in the news right now. If you've checked social media at all recently, you've more than likely seen something about it. We're not sure if that has anything to do with Amazon putting AncestryDNA test kits on sale for $30 off, but hey — we'll take it. Elizabeth Warren is usually making headlines for calling out Donald Trump — but this time, it's her recently released DNA test results that have people talking. In fact, the test itself was meant to be a clapback at Trump. According to Rolling Stone, "At a rally in July, the president bet a million dollars that Warren wouldn’t submit to DNA testing — and if she did, it would not validate her claims of Native ancestry." But now that she's done it, many are not happy, and some Cherokee tribe members are actually demanding an apology. We won't get into it here, but generally speaking, let this be a lesson that a DNA match doesn't mean you can automatically claim to be part of that culture. Moving on. SEE ALSO: Which DNA test kit should you get? This guide can help. DNA testing is also the basis of a new TV drama, because of course it is. Family History dives into the nature versus nurture debacle and shows how much deep family stuff can come out of a simple DNA test. The show just got the green light for a pilot on ABC. Our point: Doing a DNA test is on its way to becoming just as mainstream as owning a smartphone. With the news plus the rise in at-home test kit stats (it doubled in the last year), tracing your roots is basically a must-do — and this clutch sale on AncestryDNA kits is your foot in the door. AncestryDNA is one of the most popular at-home DNA services, famous for its pie chart breakdowns and it's assistance in helping you find distant relatives. They use an autosomal (family finder) DNA test to survey your whole genome at over 700,000 locations, covering both your father's and your mother's lineage (though it won't say what DNA came from which parent). That massive genealogical pool plus the high chance of connecting with found relatives via their huge user database makes it one of the best on the market. Just fill the included tube with your spit, send it back for testing, and you'll receive results in 6-8 weeks.  Regularly $99, you can save $30 and get your test kit for just $69. (Psst: This would make a super unique holiday gift as well, so feel free to stock up.) Image: ancestrydna Save $30 on AncestryDNA test kits — $69 See Details


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Scientists in Chile unveil 'A Cosmic Titan' cluster of galaxies

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 12:02

Hyperion has a mass 1 million billion times greater than the sun and is so distant that it is viewed from earth as it looked billions of years ago. "Hyperion is like 5,000 galaxies of the Milky Way", astronomer Steffen Miefke, the chief of operations for the European Southern Observatory, told Reuters. The ESO operates the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, which detected Hyperion.


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Innovation Corps (I-Corps) at NIH Program for NIH and CDC Translational Research (Admin Supp Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

NIH Funding Opportunities - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 11:50
Funding Opportunity PA-19-029 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) seeks to develop and nurture a national innovation ecosystem that builds upon biomedical research to develop technologies, products, and services that benefit society. Toward meeting this objective, the I-Corps program is being offered. The I-Corps at NIH program is focused on educating researchers and technologists on how to translate technologies from the lab into the marketplace. Under this FOA, participating NIH and CDC Institutes and Centers will continue providing administrative supplement awards to currently-funded SBIR and STTR Phase I grantees. The program is designed to provide three-member project teams with access to instruction and mentoring in order to accelerate the translation of technologies currently being developed with NIH and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) SBIR and STTR funding. It is anticipated that outcomes for the I-Corps teams participating in this program will include significantly refined commercialization plans and well-informed pivots in their overall commercialization strategies. Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to contact NIH or CDC Scientific/Research staff for more information about the program before applying.
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Exclusive: Science journal to withdraw chronic fatigue review amid patient activist complaints

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Wed, 10/17/2018 - 11:31

Emails seen by Reuters show editors at the influential Cochrane Review journal asking researchers who conducted the analysis, which was published in April 2017, to agree to it being temporarily withdrawn.  They also ask the review's authors to agree to a statement saying their analysis requires "further work in response to feedback and complaints". Published on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane's evaluations are considered a gold standard in scientific literature and known internationally as dispassionate analyses of the best evidence on a given subject. It is unusual for Cochrane to withdraw a review without the authors' agreement and unless new scientific evidence emerges for inclusion in an update.  Research into CFS and ME, widely referred to by the joint acronym CFS/ME, is highly contentious -- in part because the illness is poorly understood.


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