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Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dies at 95

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 18:54

Behind America's late leap into orbit and triumphant small step on the moon was the agile mind and guts-of-steel of Chris Kraft, making split-second decisions that propelled the nation to once unimaginable heights. Kraft, the creator and longtime leader of NASA's Mission Control, died Monday in Houston, just two days after the 50th anniversary of what was his and NASA's crowning achievement: Apollo 11's moon landing. Christopher Columbus Kraft Jr. never flew in space, but "held the success or failure of American human spaceflight in his hands," Neil Armstrong, the first man-on-the-moon, told The Associated Press in 2011.


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Couple meets recipient of 11-year-old son's heart on their wedding day: 'To me, this is where it belongs'

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 17:57

After their 11-year-old son suddenly passed away in 2012, a couple decided to donate his organs. Seven years later, on their wedding day, the recipient of their son's heart surprised the couple at the court house with a stethoscope.


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My Migraines Distorted My Vision and Speech - Here's What a Doctor Said Was Going On

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 17:54

The first time I experienced a migraine with aura, I was sitting in my high school physics class. I was grinding my way through a worksheet, eyelids heavy and sleep-deprived as usual, when a bright string of light appeared on the left side of my field of vision.


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Chris Kraft, 1st flight director for NASA, dies at 95

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 17:34

Chris Kraft, the founder of NASA's mission control, died Monday, just two days after the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Kraft made key decisions on launches as the U.S. was learning how to put a man into space. Kraft had to decide life-and-death matters, such as whether conditions were safe for launch and what to do if a problem developed.


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16 of the Funniest (and Most Relatable) Tweets About Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 17:00

These funny and relatable tweets nail what Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is like.


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Trump Enlists Pentagon on Rare-Earth Magnets Amid Chinese Threat

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 16:47

(Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump on Monday ordered the U.S. Defense Department to spur the production of a slew of rare-earth magnets used in consumer electronics, military hardware and medical research, amid concerns China will restrict exports of the products.Trump invoked the 69-year-old Defense Production Act -- once used to preserve American steelmaking capacity -- to remedy what he called “a shortfall” in production of the super-strong magnets made with rare-earth minerals neodymium and samarium.U.S. capacity to produce the magnets “is essential to the national defense,” Trump asserted in issuing the designations Monday. Without action, Trump said, American industry “cannot reasonably be expected to provide the production capability” for the products.The Defense Production Act allows the president to prioritize contracts for materials, equipment and services in order to preserve or build up domestic manufacturing capabilities. It has been invoked to compel purchases of semiconductor manufacturing equipment so companies could churn out radiation-hardened microelectronics used by the military -- such a niche market that businesses might not have made the investment on their own. It has also been deployed to finance research and procurement projects in lithium ion batteries, lightweight ammunition and other technologies.Trump’s orders Monday singled out magnets made of neodymium, iron and boron as well as those made with samarium and cobalt.The action follows a Trump administration report in June asserting that the U.S. needs a stable supply of critical minerals to ensure U.S. economic prosperity and the national defense. At the time, the Trump administration promised to take “unprecedented action” to ensure the U.S. wouldn’t be cut off from supplies of rare earths, a group of 17 obscure but vital elements whose production is dominated by China.\--With assistance from Jennifer Jacobs.To contact the reporter on this story: Jennifer A. Dlouhy in Washington at jdlouhy1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


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Multidrug-resistant malaria spreading in Southeast Asia: study

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 16:35

Strains of malaria resistant to two key anti-malarial medicines are becoming more dominant in Vietnam, Laos and northern Thailand after spreading rapidly from Cambodia, scientists warned on Monday. Using genomic surveillance to track the spread of drug-resistant malaria, the scientists found that the strain, known as KEL1/PLA1, has also evolved and picked up new genetic mutations which may make it yet more resistant to drugs. "We discovered (it) had spread aggressively, replacing local malaria parasites, and had become the dominant strain in Vietnam, Laos and northeastern Thailand," said Roberto Amato, who worked with a team from Britain's Wellcome Sanger Institute and Oxford University and Thailand's Mahidol University.


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New Study Says Paleo Diet Could Increase Your Risk of Heart Disease

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:54

Here’s why you might want to ditch the Paleo diet and eat more carbs for better health (yes, really!)


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Antibiotic use without prescription common in U.S.

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:48

A growing number of germs around the world are already resistant to antibiotics, making it increasingly difficult to treat infections that were once easy to combat with medications. While much of this problem is caused by doctors prescribing antibiotics to patients who don't need them, people who use these drugs without seeing a doctor first are also part of the problem. For the current study, researchers examined data from 31 previously published studies to assess nonprescription antibiotic use in the U.S. and the factors that may contribute to it.


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Plant-based diets tied to lower risk of type 2 diabetes

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:48

Researchers examined data from nine previously published studies with a total of 307,099 participants, including 23,544 people who developed type 2 diabetes. Overall, people who most closely adhered to a vegan, vegetarian or other type of plant-based diet were 23% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people who consumed the least amount of plant-based meals, researchers report in JAMA Internal Medicine. "Plant-based diets can promote metabolic health and reduce diabetes risk through many pathways, including preventing excess weight gain, improving insulin sensitivity, reducing inflammation, and other mechanisms," said Dr. Qi Sun, senior author of the study and a researcher at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.


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Eastern US cities spewing more methane into air than thought

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:26

Older U.S. east coast cities are leaking nine times as much natural gas into the air — from homes or pipes heading into houses — than the federal government had thought, a new airborne monitoring study finds. It's probably not a safety problem because what's coming out doesn't reach explosive concentrations, but the extra methane heading into the air is a climate change issue, said study co-author University of Michigan atmospheric scientist Eric Kort. Scientists flew a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration airplane over New York City, Washington, Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore and Providence, Rhode Island, for 1,200 hours in 2018 and found lots more methane.


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Should You Take Daily Aspirin for Your Heart?

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:14

Nearly 30 million Americans who are 40 or older—who don’t have cardiovascular disease—take aspirin every day anyway, with the aim of protecting their hearts. Of these, 6.6 million do it without a...


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Should You Take Daily Aspirin for Your Heart?

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:14

Nearly 30 million Americans who are 40 or older—who don’t have cardiovascular disease—take aspirin every day anyway, with the aim of protecting their hearts. Of these, 6.6 million do it without a...


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Study: Millions should stop taking aspirin for heart health

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:12

Millions of people who take aspirin to prevent a heart attack may need to rethink the pill-popping, Harvard researchers reported Monday. A daily low-dose aspirin is recommended for people who have already had a heart attack or stroke and for those diagnosed with heart disease. Guidelines released this year ruled out routine aspirin use for many older adults who don't already have heart disease — and said it's only for certain younger people under doctor's orders.


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The 250 Million Pound Cancer Cure review: the sci-fi approach to beating the disease

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:02

With BBC Two's superlative War In The Blood airing just a fortnight ago, we've been spoilt by cancer documentaries recently. The £250m Cancer Cure (BBC Two) wasn't in the same league, sadly, yet portrayed a medical breakthrough which inspired similar hope for the future. Proton beam therapy is one of the world’s most technologically advanced, most costly cancer treatments. However, it has the potential to save the lives of children with otherwise incurable forms of the disease.  It has only been available abroad until now - hence controversies like critically ill five-year-old Ashya King’s parents being jailed for abducting him from hospital to seek treatment overseas - but in 2015, the NHS announced it would be building two pioneering centres of its own: one at the Christie Hospital in Manchester, the other at London’s University College Hospital. Over two years, cameras followed the race to get these shiny hi-tech hubs up and running, as well as meeting the first children awaiting the laser-targeted treatment. The result was a slightly awkward blend of engineering documentary and health report.  First came the construction phase, reminiscent of those boy’s toys documentaries about monster machines and supersized diggers. Building these facilities in the heart of cities was no mean feat. As scientists explained, it was like plonking a particle accelerator in the middle of a busy hospital - or a nuclear power station in a town centre. The process generates so much radiation, it had to be housed in a maze-like nuclear bunker with four metre-thick concrete walls. The biggest hole ever to exist in London was excavated. Hard hats and hi-vis vests were worn. We watched with bated breath as multi-million pound precision kit was lowered through the roof by crane with mere inches to spare.  In a documentary of two halves, then came the medical case studies. We met 15-year-old Morgan, who owed his life to proton beam therapy in America for a rare form of facial cancer, as did four-year-old Lucas, who it had cured of bladder cancer. Mainly, though, cameras followed 15-year-old Mason as he became one of the first patients to receive proton beam therapy in the UK. At the newly opened Christie centre, he embarked on a six-week course of treatment targeting his inoperable brain tumour. With its rotating chambers, moulded masks and glowing green beams, this was sci-fi fare.  Mason was a lovely, plucky lad, so it was all the more emotional when he got to ring the “end of treatment” bell and return to school to take his GCSEs. Sweetly, he’s hoping to become a doctor when he’s older. Who could blame him? The tireless scientists and medics here were all hugely committed and thoroughly admirable.   Actress Lorraine Ashbourne’s narration went overboard on the patronising comparisons, Everything was as big as a jumbo jet, an Olympic-sized swimming pool or the Royal Albert Hall. It rather reminded me of going through the round window on Play School. The Christie centre is already seeing 10 patients per day, with the UCH site scheduled to open next summer. Together, they could save hundreds of young lives each year.  This was an enlightening behind-the-scenes look at a cutting edge, cancer-zapping development. However, the uneven film only truly hit its stride in the home stretch and didn't quite do its fascinating subject justice.


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People Are Misusing Antibiotics, New Study Reveals

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:00

If you’ve ever had a cold that keeps you up at night coughing or painful urinary tract infections that recur regularly, you may have been tempted to simply help yourself to the antibiotics you’ve...


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People Are Misusing Antibiotics, New Study Reveals

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 15:00

If you’ve ever had a cold that keeps you up at night coughing or painful urinary tract infections that recur regularly, you may have been tempted to simply help yourself to the antibiotics you’ve...


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Have space fever? Here are five jobs that will take you to closer to the stars

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 14:12

From space historian to space doctor, jobs that will take you where no man has gone before are becoming more mainstream.


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Man contracts flesh-eating disease while visiting Florida beach: 'I almost lost my leg or my life'

Yahoo Science News feed latest items - Mon, 07/22/2019 - 14:07

A Georgia man was hospitalized after contracting a flesh-eating bacteria whilevacationing in Panama City, Fla


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